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Look Back: A Little Something From Our Files for the Week of June 19

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By Cheryl Duncan, Assistant Editor

25 Years Ago
It was the summer of sequels on the big screen. Sylvester Stallone’s Rambo III was at Harriman’s Princess Theatre, where all seats were $1.50 on Sunday afternoon and Tuesday night. A Friday-only showing of the Stallone flick was down the road in Oliver Springs, where the Tri-County Mall Cinema 3 also offered up Crocodile Dundee II, Poltergeist III and the only non-sequel on area screens, The Great Outdoors with Dan Aykroyd and John Candy. The Roman numeral movie craze was far from over: the Oliver Springs theater promised Short Circuit II as a coming attraction.

10 Years Ago
Paul Johnston came out of retirement to answer the Holston United Methodist Conference’s call to pastor Asbury Chapel United Methodist Church in Rockwood. No cross-country move was necessary: Johnston was already in Rockwood. His wife, the former Betty Neal, is a Rockwood native, and the couple had moved to the area two years previous to Johnston’s new assignment.

Five Years Ago
Consumers continued to scout out ways to pay escalating fuel costs, and Roane County school officials were no exception. The proposed school budget included a $40,000 increase for diesel fuel, and Board of Education member Mike “Brillo” Miller pondered several possibilities for saving money. Among them was a four-day school week, which would take buses off the road one day a week. “If fuel went up to $6 a gallon, we would have to look at doing something,” Chairman Earl Nall agreed. “But we can’t just say we’re going to go to a four-day school week when the state won’t allow us to do it.”

One Year Ago

Parishioners were getting ready to return to Kingston United Methodist Church’s sanctuary for the first time in more than a year. “It’s kind of like a totally new beginning,” reflected Judy Rose, one of the church members displaced from the house of worship after an April 2011 fire damaged the sanctuary. The blaze, though devastating, afforded the congregation the opportunity to rebuild a larger, more modern sanctuary with a stained-glass front window, projector capabilities, a new sound system, an enlarged stage area for concerts and plays, and a new handicap egress.