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Tiger Haven should be liable financially

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I want to address a problem that has concerned my neighbors and me for 20 years. I live next to a facility that houses some of the most dangerous animals in the world. Just hearing them growl in the morning is enough to put the fear of God in anyone, and they are not pit bulls.
Imagine having to listen to a loud, ferocious roar morning, noon and night, knowing a vicious animal may escape at any time. It’s a nuisance that not only bothers me, but also all of my neighbors.
A dual nuisance is one that, while producing injury to the public at large, does some special damage to some individual or class. It is difficult to say what degree of annoyance constitutes a nuisance. If a thing is calculated to interfere with the comfortable enjoyment of a man’s house, it is a nuisance.
In relation to offensive trades, it seems that when such a trade renders that enjoyment of life and property uncomfortable, it is a nuisance. This same nuisance in Roane County is so dangerous it has required the government to create a plan to evacuate the area in case of an emergency. What would it cost, and who would foot the bill?
A nusiance, as it pertains to Tiger Haven, involves losses of property value due to the noise and water pollution, along with the excrement of hundreds of the big cats.
The fear of escape has prompted Roane County to initiate plans for evacuation should any of the cats escape.
Any person who keeps Class 1 wildlife is liable for any costs incurred resulting from escape.
It is an appropriate question to request proof of financial responsibility for such liabilities.
I request the Roane County News print the owners’ names and current amount of liability coverage to cover its responsibilities.
Albert Tate
Dogwood Valley Road

Editor’s note: Tiger Haven is
a nonprofit entity that, according
to authorities who monitor such
facilities, appears to be operating within the law. We will continue to follow the legal complaints between some of the neighbors against the big-cat sanctuary.