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Community News

  • Harriman Happenings: March 5

    By Louise Warmley, Community correspondent
    Last Saturday, the sanctuary was filled with people who attended the Black History Program at Anointed Praise and Worship Church.

    Lots of youth from different churches took part in this service. Mary Alice Douglas was the best; she played the part of an old lady who grew up in Tupelo, Miss., and she told how things were then and how they are now. She encouraged the youth to get all the education they can and make the best of it.

  • Sousa’s ‘Liberty Bell March’ to kick off Babahatchie concert

    Babahatchie Community Band will honor “March King” John Philip Sousa with the opening number at its March 4 concert.

    The concert begins at 3 p.m. in Harriman High School auditorium. Admission is free.

    Sousa’s “Liberty Bell March was originally written for his unfinished operetta the Devil’s Deputy but financing for the production fell through, said band member Alison Westrich.

  • The Garden Gate: Dowsing’s a divine art with nature’s witch hazel

    By Ellen Probert Williamson
    Is it possible that you are a dowser or, as dowsers are sometimes called, a water witch?

    Dowsing is an ancient craft using branches of the witch hazel or willow tree to locate the presence of underground water. The dowser holds a wishbone-shaped, forked branch straight out before him and walks up and down, back and forth, over the terrain where he hopes to find a water source and construct a well.

    Not everyone has this ability. Perhaps you do.

  • Look Back: A Little Something From Our Files From the Week of Feb. 29

    25 Years Ago
    Harriman Utility Board passed sewer rate increases that hiked business rates as much as 395 percent and residential user rates about 60 percent. The increase was necessary to fund construction of a state-mandated new wastewater treatment facility.

    10 Years Ago

  • Charles takes heart in cardiac rehab

    Tommy Charles never imagined he’d entertain the same bad habit he’d seen consume his father’s life — and even contribute to his death.

    But three packs of cigarettes a day and one heart attack later, Charles “got like Dad.”

    At 55 years old, Charles’ father died from a heart attack. He smoked three packs of cigarettes a day and was overweight and inactive.

    At 46, only nine years younger than the age his father died, Charles himself suffered a heart attack.

  • United Way to cap off its year

    Roane County United Way will have its annual meeting and campaign celebration next month.

    The event will be from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. March 29 in Michael Dunn Center’s conference meeting room at 629 Gallaher Road, Kingston.

    “This event is always a special time to thank our donors, volunteers and agencies who are at the heart of the Roane County United Way,” said Amy Harmon, executive director.

    Roane County United Way surpassed its $400,000 fundraising goal for 2011.

  • FSA offering producers free online info service

    Farmers and ranchers in Tennessee now have a more efficient, timely option for receiving important Farm Service Agency program eligibility requirements, deadlines and related information.  

    “FSA is now offering free online communications through our GovDelivery electronic news service,” said Gene Davidson, Tennessee Farm Service Agency executive director.

  • Roane County looks for success in 2012 Great American Cleanup

    Spring time is near, signaling the return of the nation’s largest annual community improvement program, Keep America Beautiful’s Great American Cleanup.

    Last year, 143,053 Tennessee volunteers contributed 358,240 hours picking up more than 121 million pounds of litter and debris from all 95 counties. Visit www.ktnb.org/gac.html for more results.

    Keep Tennessee Beautiful will once again look for improvement during this year’s GAC in Tennessee, which will take place March 1-May 31.

  • $16.1 million in refunds await Tennesseans

    Refunds of more than $16.1 million may be waiting for about 18,400 Tennesseans who did not file a federal income tax return for 2008.

    Nationwide, the Internal Revenue Service has more than $1 billion for about 1 million people who haven't yet filed for 2008.

    To collect the money, a return for 2008 must be filed with the IRS no later than April 17.

    There is no penalty for filing a late return qualifying for a refund.

  • Website offers state's residents free legal assistance

    More than 100 low-income Tennesseans are receiving free legal assistance every month through the OnlineTNJustice.org website, but backers of the project want to serve more.

    "With one in five Tennesseans in poverty, and with most of them having access to a computer in a library, church, or other location, we are doing all we can to spread the word that Online Tennessee Justice is a great place for them to turn to when they need help with legal problems," Memphis attorney George T. "Buck" Lewis said of the project.