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Community News

  • Harriman’s TubaChristmas concert Dec. 3

    Merry TubaChristmas is celebrating its 38th anniversary. Created by Harvey Phillips, Merry Tuba Christmas 2011 concerts will be presented in more than 250 cities throughout the United States and in several foreign countries.
    Phillips was inspired to create Tuba Christmas as an annual event honoring his teacher, the late tubist William J. Bell, who was born on Christmas Day in 1902.  
    Every Christmas season, tuba and euphonium players of all ages gather to pay respects to Bell and all the great artists and teachers who represent their heritage.  

  • The Garden Gate: ‘Super trees’ deserving of the title

    By Ellen Probert Williamson
    One of the oldest living species of plants in the world is the gingko tree, which has flourished unchanged for nearly 200 million years, when dinosaurs roamed the Earth during the Mezozoic period. For this reason it is often referred to as a living fossil.

    Botanists researching the ancient evolution of plants through their fossil remains have discovered gingko trees were to be found in many parts of the world in prehistoric
    times.

  • Leadership group touring Roane

    The East Tennessee Regional Leadership Association is touring Roane County today, Nov. 16, as its final class of the 2011 season.

    Environment is the topic of the tour to be led by Tony LaMance, the Roane County ETRLA representative.

    “I want folks experience the awesome beauty not only in the natural surroundings, but our people who make it such a wonderful place to be,” LaMance said of his plans for the tour.

  • Look Back: A Little Something From Our Files From the Week of Nov. 16

    25 Years Ago
    A drug awareness seminar in Kingston gave the community an opportunity to discover and discuss new ideas about chemical dependency. Education was the seminar’s central focus. “Chemical dependency has always been with us and will always be with us,” said Bill Hood, director of the Adult Chemical Dependency Program at Peninsula Hospital. “The best way we can combat this problem is through education.”

    10 Years Ago

  • Start a new holiday tradition with a ride on the rails

    Southern Appalachia Railway Museum has an answer for what to do after celebrating the old-time tradition of Thanksgiving:  

    Celebrate the old-time tradition of 1940s-era rail travel.

    The museum will roll out its Secret City Scenic Excursion Train on Nov. 25-26 for one-hour rides through the Manhattan Project K-25 Site and picturesque Poplar Creek Valley of Roane County.

  • Cheer Gifts sought for area seniors

    Mid-East Community Action Agency’s Office on Aging urges the public to include area senior citizens in their holiday giving this year.

    “As many of us have families to enjoy these festivities with, there are homebound elderly right here in our communities who are sitting in cold homes and isolated from the outside world,” said Amber Jacks, director of Mid-East’s Office on Aging.

  • Look Back: A Little Something From Our Files From the Week of Nov. 9

    25 Years Ago

  • The Garden Gate: Fruitcakes full of ancient exotic ingredients

    By Ellen Probert Williamson
    November is a month of crisp days, golden sunshine, falling leaves, cider mills and looking forward to holiday excitements.

    Part of that is the planning ahead of holiday foods. At this time of year, spices, candied fruit, flowers and herbs play a large part.

    Take fruitcake, for instance. When you think of its ingredients and traditions, you find yourself suddenly viewing a whole world of exotic times and places.

  • It takes a team to fight against breast cancer

    Dr. Kristan Lay urges a team effort when thinking about breast cancer awareness and treatment.

    “The first member on your breast cancer team is you,” said Lay, Roane Medical Center’s pathologist and laboratory director, during a recent presentation to the Roane County United Way.

    “You should be the team captain – playing an integral role in your healthcare decisions.”

  • Never too young for breast cancer awareness