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Community News

  • Free Clinic treats 1,600 in two years

    The Free Medical Clinic of Oak Ridge has treated more than 1,600 individuals in 4,500 individual visits during its first two years of operation, board members recently learned during a three-year strategic planning meeting.

    The goal of the board is to continue the clinic’s mission, “People Caring for People,” and to increase services and hours at the clinic, which sees a number of patients from Roane County.

  • Look Back: A Little Something From Our Files From the Week of March 28

    25 Years Ago
    A 45-pound beaver was found dead by the side of the road. It was believed to be one of three beavers that constructed a 7-foot-high dam in Walnut Hill off Hwy. 27. Its tail was 12 inches long and 5 inches wide. Harriman taxidermist Johnny Newberry stuffed the beaver for permanent display in the Harriman Utility Board lobby. Because of its uniqueness, the dam drew so many visitors that officials built a walkway leading to and from the site.

    10 Years Ago

  • The Garden Gate: Consider the lily in this Easter season

    By Ellen Probert Williamson
    In ancient times, spices and perfumes were interchangeable. Herbs were used for everything from cooking and decorating to medicine.

    Rose water and musk were used to flavor foods. Vanilla and cinnamon were used as perfume.  Frankincense and myrrh, used both in the kitchen and in perfumes, were the gifts chosen for the Christ Child because they were the most valuable commodities in the ancient world.

  • Lots of opportunities to give blood

    Medic Regional Blood Center is in need of all blood types.

    “Medic Regional Blood Center continues to struggle to meet the needs of their service area of 21 counties and 27 area hospitals,” said Christi Fightmaster of Medic public relations.

    A number of opportunities are available to give blood in Roane County in the coming days. They include:

     April 5 — Oliver Springs Food City, Medic mobile unit, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.

  • MILITARY MATTERS: Lauren M. Manning

    Air National Guard Airman 1st Class Lauren M. Manning recently graduated from basic military training at Lackland Air Force Base, San Antonio.

    Daughter of Rebecca and Ronnie Manning of Oliver Springs, she is a 2007 graduate of Clinton High School.

    The airman completed an intensive, eight-week program that included training in military discipline and studies, Air Force core values, physical fitness, and basic warfare principles and skills.

  • 'Round Rockwood: March 21

    By Josephine McKinney
    This spring-like weather has been a wonderful time to go places and do things. One of the most wonderful things I’ve enjoyed most was a group of residents of Victorian Square took a trip to Crossville to see the live production of the play “Driving Miss Daisy.”

    Miss Daisy had a chauffeur to drive her places, like to town where she instructed him to drive to the right, go one block, turn right again, then again turn right, and he says, “Why, Miss Daisy, this is where we came from.”

  • Harriman Happenings: March 21

    By Louise Warmley
    Anointed Praise and Worship Church had its annual Women’s Day last Sunday. The theme was Faith, Hope, Love.

    Morning speaker was Sister Mary Alice Douglas. She spoke from the theme. Music was provided by the men of the church.

    The speakers for the afternoon service were Sister Danielle Key, who spoke on faith. Sister Sara Douglas spoke on hope, and Sister Rebecca Womack spoke on love. Sisters Mary Hickey and Julia Harris provided the music.

  • Look Back: A Little Something From Our Files From the Week of March 21

    25 Years Ago
    With no public notice of the meeting, several school board members met to discuss restructuring Rockwood’s school system. Without meaning to violate the Sunshine Law, board members considered having seventh- and eighth-graders remain at Rockwood Junior High and moving ninth-graders to the high school.

    10 Years Ago

  • The Garden Gate: Get ready for April’s series of contrasts

    By Ellen Probert Williamson
    Spring officially began this year on March 20, and with it comes some warmer days. New leaves are beginning to appear on some of the trees, and little violets and forget-me-nots star the new grass among dandelions. So many springtime traditions come to mind.

    Soon it will be April, a month of tremendous contrasts in history, legend and tradition.

  • Kingston’s Beets secretary of ETDD/ETHRA board

    Kingston Mayor Troy Beets was recently elected secretary of the East Tennessee Development District and East Tennessee Human Resource Agency board of directors.

    Beets was elected by unanimous consent of the board during the agency’s annual business meetings and luncheon earlier this month in Knoxville.

    He and the other newly elected officers will assume their positions effective July 1.

    Campbell County Mayor William Baird was elected board chairman.