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Community News

  • Boy Scout Troop 101 to start annual tree sale on Nov. 28

    Kingston Boy Scout Troop 101 will begin its annual Christmas tree sale at 1 p.m. Nov. 28 at the Gravel Pit shelter of Kingston City Park.

    Tree sales will continue all trees are sold or until Dec. 23.

    Trees offered for sale this year will come from Roan Mountain.

    Proceeds from the tree sale support the Scouts in their camping, outdoor activities and service to the community.

    Troop 101 has provided hundreds of hours of community service this year, with five completed Eagle Scout projects in the area.

  • Tubists put ‘oom-pha’ in Christmas

    The Babahatchie Community Band will present Harriman’s 26th annual Merry TubaChristmas concert at 11:45 a.m. Dec. 6 in Harriman High School’s James M. Williamson Auditorium.

    Registration begins at 9:30 a.m., with rehearsal at 10.

    The tuba/euphonium choir under the direction of Sande MacMorran will perform carols and songs of Christmas in a free public concert.

    Tuba/sousaphone and euphonium/baritone players of all degrees of ability are welcome to participate in this event.

    Call Dr. Joseph Williams at 882-3446 for details.

  • Military Matters: Austin J. Jackson

    U.S. Air Force Airman Austin J. Jackson recently graduated from basic military training at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, San Antonio.

    Son of William A. and Amanda B. Jackson of Kingston, he is a 2014 graduate of Roane County High School, Kingston.

    The airman completed an intensive, eight-week program that included training in military discipline and studies, Air Force core values, physical fitness, and basic warfare principles and skills.

  • The Garden Gate: Did the pomegranate lead to exile from Eden?

    Editor’s note: As Ellen Probert Williams continues her respite, we share one of her classic columns, first published on Nov. 14, 2012.

    Pomegranates are one of the world’s most exotic fruits.

    In some medieval paintings, Adam and Eve are portrayed with a pomegranate as the fatal “apple” in the Garden of Eden. The fruits are certainly ancient enough in their lineage.

    One of the most ancient fruits, the pomegranate is mentioned in 14 books of the Bible and in many other ancient writings.

  • Free Knoxville hospital workshop to assist with health plan enrollments

    Tennova Healthcare will offer area residents free assistance in learning about and enrolling in health insurance options on the Health Insurance Marketplace.

    The health system will have a free workshop to help individuals enroll from 8 a.m. to noon Nov. 22 in the registration department at Physicians Regional Medical Center at 900 E. Oak Hill Ave., Knoxville.

    Application counselors will be on hand to help with enrollments on a first-come, first-served basis.

  • Harriman Happenings 11/17

    Last Sunday Redd Hardy was ordained for a deacon at St. Mary’s Missionary Baptist Church in Chattanooga, where he has been a member for a long time.

    Herbert and Carolyn Griffin, Richard and Mary Hickey, Keith and Jill Johnson and Rosa Osborn of Harriman attended this service.

    Deacon Hickey read the Scripture. Deacon Griffin gave the duty of a deacon and Carolyn gave encouraging expressions to her daughter, Redd’s wife.

    Robin’s son Randy Shannon sang a melody of songs.

  • On vacation ... with the Roane County News

    Kingston City Council member Teresa Nichols and her husband, Jeff, took the Roane County News with them on a recent trip to Denmark.

    The trio stopped by Legoland in Billund, Denmark, for one of the paper’s more fun photos. Planning a vacation? Take your Roane County News along and pose with it to be included in an upcoming issue. Be sure to tell us where you — and the News — traveled for a break and photo. You may drop off photos at the newspaper office at 204 Franklin St., Kingston, or email to newsroom@roanecounty.com. Happy travels!

  • CONTACT training reassurance volunteers

    CONTACT Care Line will have a free training session for those interested in its reassurance program.

    The training will be from 2 to 4 p.m. Nov. 13 in Grace Lutheran Church at 131 W. Gettysburg Ave., Oak Ridge.

    Volunteers may park in the back parking lot of the church and enter through the double-glass doors.

    Those interested in more information may call 865-312-7450 or email office@contact

    carelinetn.org and leave a name and phone number.

  • UT opens new mobile spay/neuter clinic

    The University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine has officially opened its new mobile spay/neuter clinic.

    “We look forward to a time when a lack of available locations where people can get their pets spayed and neutered is a thing of the past,” said Karen Walsh, a field program manager with PetSmart Charities Inc.

    The charity made the unit possible with a $260,485 grant.

    The 36-foot unit includes three surgery tables, holding cages and an oxygenizer.

  • The Garden Gate: Indian legends abound about popular veggies

    Editor’s note: As Ellen Probert Williams continues her respite, we share one of her classic columns, first published on Nov. 7, 2012.

    There are some interesting legends among various Indian tribes concerning the origins of some of our most popular vegetables.

    One widely held superstitious belief insists that a naked squaw strolling through her garden on a moonlit night dragging her garment behind her would ensure a good crop and would prevent cutworms from destroying the planted vegetables, especially corn.