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Community News

  • Civil War trails guide available

    The Tennessee Department of Tourist Development has updated Tennessee Civil War trails map-guides available to the public.

    The guide identifies nearly 200 Civil War sites throughout Tennessee on this self-guided tour of the trails.

    “More than 500,000 copies of the original map-guide were distributed to the traveling public in little more than six months,” said Susan Whitaker, who serves as co-chairwoman of the Sesquicentennial Commission.

  • Team rally kicks off Relay for Life '11

    The American Cancer Society’s Relay for Life of Roane County recently kicked off its 2011 relay season with a team rally.

    This year’s Relay for Life is planned from 6 p.m. April 29 to 8 a.m. April 30 on Roane State Community College’s main campus in Roane County.

    Public participation is encouraged. Monthly team rallies will take place at 5:30 p.m. the third Tuesday of each month in Room O-201 at Roane State.

    The upcoming relay team rallies, which will take place monthly until the event, will last for an hour.

  • 'Take Flight' exhibit coming to OR

    Children will have opportunities to create airplanes, helicopters and rockets from paper, launch them and discover the principles and forces that make flight possible in a new exhibit headed to Oak Ridge.

    “Take Flight,” a traveling exhibition from Science Works, will be open Feb. 5-April 24 in American Museum of Science and Energy of Oak Ridge.

    Innovative devices will help visitors launch paper airplanes to hit a target, release twirlers above the hoverport and blast paper rockets to new heights.  

  • NNSA celebrates nuclear science

    The National Nuclear Security Administration is celebrating National Nuclear Science Week with five days of features on the NNSA website that showcase the innovations and opportunities in nuclear science.
    Each day this week, NNSA’s Nuclear Science Week website, www.nuclearscienceweek.org, will feature a different way nuclear science is at the core of its mission.

  • Look Back: A Little Something From Our Files From the Week of Jan. 26

    25 Years Ago

  • The Garden Gate: Industry makes ice twice as nice

    By Ellen Probert Williamson

  • MILITARY MATTERS: Robert T. Givens

    Army Reserve Sgt. Robert T. Givens served as a support staff member during the 2011 U.S. Army All-American Bowl at the Alamodome in San Antonio.  

    Givens, a healthcare specialist (combat medic) sustainment instructor, is assigned to the 228th Combat Support Hospital at Fort Sam Houston, San Antonio. The reservist has served in the military for 10 years.

    The son of Kyong O. Givens of Rockwood, he was a 1984 graduate of Cumberland County High School, Crossville.

  • MILITARY MATTERS: John E. Gilliland

    The U.S. Air Force recently promoted John E. Gilliland to the rank of lieutenant colonel.

    Gilliland is the staff judge advocate at Goodfellow Air Force Base, San Angelo, Texas. He is currently deployed as the staff judge advocate at Combined Forces Special Operations Component Command, Afghanistan.  

    A Roane County native and a 1987 graduate of Roane County High School, he is the son of Julianne Bailey and Robert Brown of Kingston and William Gilliland of Manchester. He is the brother of Kelli G. Klidzejs of Manchester.

  • West Roane Volunteer Fire Dept. giving away smoke detectors

    West Roane County Volunteer Fire Department has free smoke detectors available for residences and businesses within its response area.

    The free detectors come with a 10-year battery and are available at no charge.

    West Roane County Fire Chief Charlie Redwine said the detectors and billboard advertising were made available to the department via a FEMA/DHS Assistance to Firefighters Grant Program for Fire Prevention and Safety.

  • Working families urged to claim tax credit

    This tax season, the Tennessee Department of Human Services is again calling on eligible working individuals and families across the state to take advantage of a federal tax credit that can put earned income back into their pockets.

    The Earned Income Tax Credit, launched in the mid-1970s, is considered to be one of the most effective anti-poverty programs in the country.