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Community News

  • Blood drive March 21 in Harriman

    Medic Regional Blood Center is one of many area organizations eager to say goodbye to the cold doldrums of winter and welcome the warmth of spring.

    “This winter has been brutal, and we have been playing catch up because of all the drives we have had to cancel due to inclement weather,” said Christi Fightmaster, Medic spokeswoman.

    The area blood provider is hoping that warmer weather will bring a renewed interest on behalf of blood donors.

    “We hope that this new season we see an upswing in our collections,” Fightmaster said.

  • Vandy tips ease time-change disruption

    Daylight saving time begins at 2 a.m. on Sunday, March 9, bringing more sunshine in the evenings at the price of an hour of sleep. Vanderbilt Sleep Disorders Center specialist Dr. Kelly Brown says a little extra planning can alleviate that groggy feeling that often accompanies the time change.

    “You wouldn’t think moving clocks an hour would make much of a difference, but it really can. Especially for night owls and people with underlying sleep disorders, it can be a tough transition,” Brown said.

  • The Garden Gate: We’re in the salad days — as were our ancestors

    Physicians in the 15th century had never heard of vitamins.

    They were, nonetheless, on the right track when they recommended salads as part of a healthful diet and suggested goutweed as an additional ingredient for preventative measures.

    The word “salad” dates back to the days of Caesar, when the Romans sprinkled “sal” (salt) on their salads. Long before, however, people were eating salads — or salad-type foods.

    Though its beginnings are unknown, lettuce is an ancient herbal plant.

  • Look Back: A Little Something From Our Files From the Week of March 5

    25 Years Ago

  • ‘Hoops for Hope’ aids Child Advocacy Center

    Roane Countians have an opportunity to step up and make a difference in the lives of children who have been the victims of severe physical abuse and/or sexual abuse.

    Kids First Child Advocacy Center will have a fundraising dinner and auction on May 7 to enable it to provide free services to victims of child abuse living in Roane, Loudon, Morgan and Meigs counties.

    This year’s theme, “Hoops for Hope” is inspired by guest speaker Holly Warlick, head basketball coach of the University of Tennessee’s Lady Volunteers.

  • Practical gardening skills to be taught at spring workshop

    “Practical Skills for the Backyard Garden” will be the focus of Roane County Master Gardeners’ spring gardening workshop.

    The Master Gardeners and Roane County University of Tennessee Extension will host their annual spring workshop from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. March 15 for adults in the community.

    This year’s workshop will focus on providing practical skills that the average homeowner can use in a backyard garden.

    The cost is $25 and includes supplies and lunch.

  • Kingston Lions Club pancakes a bargain, still at $5 for adults

    In spring, thoughts turn to daffodils, tulips, forsythia — and pancakes.

    To satisfy the sweet tooth, the Kingston Lions Club has scheduled its annual pancake breakfast from 7 to 11 a.m. March 29 in Kingston Church of Christ’s family center.

    The cost is the same as last year: $5 for adults, $2 for children younger than 12.

    The menu will again include pancakes, bacon, sausage, orange juice, milk and coffee.

  • Bell ringers to be cited on Friday

    The Salvation Army Roane and Morgan Counties Service Unit will honor those who gave of their time and efforts to serve as volunteer bell ringers during the holiday season.

    The volunteer appreciation event will be from 6 to 8 p.m. March 7 in the conference room of Roane County Rescue Squad at 2735 Roane State Hwy., Midtown.

    Refreshments will be served.

    Those attending are asked to observe posted parking restrictions.

  • Senior Nutrition program in need of assistance

    Mid-East Community Action Agency delivers nutritionally balanced meals to the isolated, frail and elderly in Roane and Loudon counties.

    But the skyrocketing cost of food, fuel and stagnant budgets is placing seniors served by the program in a perilous situation.

    “The Senior Nutrition program is trying to maintain current service levels,” said Amber Jacks, Mid-East senior services director, about the program that has served the two counties for more than three decades.

  • Controlled burns underway on DOE’s Oak Ridge lands

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge Office has initiated a series of controlled burns of grassland areas on the Oak Ridge Reservation for prescribed burning.

    The controlled burns at the East Tennessee Technology Park and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are underway through April.