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Community News

  • Get ready for Christmas Ideas Fair

    Rural Mixers Family and Community Education Club members are gearing up for this week’s Christmas Ideas Fair.

    Club members include, seated, Rachel Wright and Robin Greenburg; and standing, Linda Rogers, Judy Murray, Lennie Stansbury, Madge Jackson and Debbie Genona.

    The Christmas Ideas Fair, a project of Roane County FCE clubs, will be from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Nov. 6 and from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Nov. 7 in Kingston Community Center.

    Handmade items and crafts will be featured, with lunch and dinner available on Thursday, and lunch available on Friday.

  • Preorders taken for DAR veterans book

    The Roane County Veterans Book compiled by Southwest Point Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution, Kingston, is with the publishing company.

    The books will be sold to the public, and preorders are now being accepted now.

    Contact Connie Williams at 717-3949 or Barbara Wasilko at 310-4560 for details.

    The finished product is expected to be available for public purchase by January.

    Veterans, families and friends submitted the biographies to preserve the history of Roane County veterans.

  • State parks offering vets free golf, camping

    Tennessee State Parks is offering free state parks day to all Tennessee veterans, offering one free night of camping and/or a complimentary round of golf with appropriate identification on Veterans Day, Nov. 11.

    “On Veterans Day, we honor the many brave men and women who have served our country,” Deputy Commissioner Brock Hill said.

  • The Garden Gate: Indian legends abound about popular veggies

    Editor’s note: As Ellen Probert Williams continues her respite, we share one of her classic columns, first published on Nov. 7, 2012.

    There are some interesting legends among various Indian tribes concerning the origins of some of our most popular vegetables.

    One widely held superstitious belief insists that a naked squaw strolling through her garden on a moonlit night dragging her garment behind her would ensure a good crop and would prevent cutworms from destroying the planted vegetables, especially corn.

  • Harriman Happenings November 3

    I wish Mark Hightower a speedy recovery.

    He recently had surgery at a hospital in Knoxville. He is feeling some better and is at home recuperating.

    Kenneth Edward Gillespie from Atlanta recently spent a weekend visiting with his sister, Margaret Ruth Collier and her family, and his brother, LC Gillespie, and his wife Mary Alice.

    He always comes to see me before returning home. He is a former resident of Harriman.

  • Youngsters in the pink for breast cancer awareness

    The Henry Center, a program of the Michael Dunn Center, chose Oct. 29 as a day of recognition for Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

    Youngsters donning their pink in observance of the month are Lukas Hanousek, Cadyn Newman, Walter Poland, Anaya Patel, Ally Freels, Bryson Brackins, Abbigail Welch, Mylaah Chatman, Isabella Whittenbarger, Zayden Vanover, Karissa Vanover, Opal Morris, Bella Williams, Zailyn Dyer, James Reid, Sam Segatto, Ta’Naya Scandlyn, Jaxon Armes, Preston Pugh, Kelley Cleveland and Tom Evans.

  • Still openings in AARP Smart Driver class

    There are still some openings available in the AARP driver safety course to be taught in Roane County next month.

    The eight-hour class, from noon to 4 p.m. Nov. 4-5, offers area senior citizens a refresher course on driving and an update on rules of the road.

    The class will be in Rockwood Community Center at 710 N. Chamberlain Ave.

    Course participants will be taught to adjust to age-related physical changes; reduce incidents of violations and accidents; and update driving skills and rules of the road in a stress-free environment.

  • Gala set in Oak Ridge

    Knox Heritage and the East Tennessee Preservation Alliance will have the Alexander Inn Gala Preservation Celebration in Oak Ridge on Nov. 7.

    Those attending will be among the first to experience the newly restored and renovated historic Guest House/Alexander Inn and celebrate this significant preservation achievement for East Tennessee and the nation.

    A 1950s-era cocktail party will take place while those attending revisit the onn’s storied past and discover its new place as part of the future of Oak Ridge.

  • Fall Happenings 2014

    Pumpkin Patches
    • Rockwood First Christian Church will have its annual pumpkin patch through Oct. 31. Hours are from noon to 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday, with pumpkins and gourds of all sizes and varieties available. Groups are welcome, and plenty of photo opportunities are available. The church is at 328 W. Rockwood St.; visit www.rockwoodfcc.org or call 354-1753 for details.

  • The Garden Gate: This berry can weigh hundreds of pounds

    Editor’s note: As Ellen Probert Williams continues her respite, we share one of her classic columns, first published on Oct. 24, 2012.

    Using pumpkins as jack-o’-lanterns for Halloween is an American idea — an adaption of the medieval custom of making lanterns out of hollowed-out turnips.

    Those in medieval England, Scotland and Ireland believed elves, ghosts and fairies haunted the Earth. It was customary to build huge bonfires to ward them off.