.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Community News

  • Youngsters in the pink for breast cancer awareness

    The Henry Center, a program of the Michael Dunn Center, chose Oct. 29 as a day of recognition for Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

    Youngsters donning their pink in observance of the month are Lukas Hanousek, Cadyn Newman, Walter Poland, Anaya Patel, Ally Freels, Bryson Brackins, Abbigail Welch, Mylaah Chatman, Isabella Whittenbarger, Zayden Vanover, Karissa Vanover, Opal Morris, Bella Williams, Zailyn Dyer, James Reid, Sam Segatto, Ta’Naya Scandlyn, Jaxon Armes, Preston Pugh, Kelley Cleveland and Tom Evans.

  • Fall Happenings 2014

    Pumpkin Patches
    • Rockwood First Christian Church will have its annual pumpkin patch through Oct. 31. Hours are from noon to 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday, with pumpkins and gourds of all sizes and varieties available. Groups are welcome, and plenty of photo opportunities are available. The church is at 328 W. Rockwood St.; visit www.rockwoodfcc.org or call 354-1753 for details.

  • The Garden Gate: This berry can weigh hundreds of pounds

    Editor’s note: As Ellen Probert Williams continues her respite, we share one of her classic columns, first published on Oct. 24, 2012.

    Using pumpkins as jack-o’-lanterns for Halloween is an American idea — an adaption of the medieval custom of making lanterns out of hollowed-out turnips.

    Those in medieval England, Scotland and Ireland believed elves, ghosts and fairies haunted the Earth. It was customary to build huge bonfires to ward them off.

  • Newspaper digitization to be lecture focus

    Historical newspaper records once available only through long hours of research can now

    be accessed within seconds.

    In a lecture on Oct. 29, project coordinator Louisa Trott will talk about the scope of The Tennessee Digitization Project, its value to researchers and how it can be accessed.

    Trott will also give examples of the many types of information to be found in newspapers from the period.

    The lecture, free and open to the public, will begin at noon in the East Tennessee History Center at 601 S. Gay St., Knoxville.

  • Heritage tourism expert to speak at session to study future of OR museum

    Lee Curtis, a recognized expert on heritage tourism, will be the guest speaker during a community meeting to gather input on the future of American Museum of Science and Energy operations.

    The city of Oak Ridge and the museum Foundation invited Curtis, director of program development and legislative liaison for the Tennessee Department of Tourist Development, to be the featured speaker in the fourth community public meeting.

    The meeting will be from 6 to 8 p.m. Oct. 23 in the museum at 300 S. Tulane Ave., Oak Ridge.

  • On vacation with the Roane County News ... in New York City!

    The Roane County News took a bite out of the Big Apple when it accompanied Mackenzie Leach on a fall break trip to New York City.

    The pair pause for a photo in Central Park on their big site-seeing tour.

    Planning a vacation? Take your Roane County News along and pose with it to be included in an upcoming issue.

    Be sure to tell us where you — and the News — traveled for a break and photo.

    You may drop off photos at the newspaper office at 204 Franklin St., Kingston, or email to newsroom@roanecounty.com.

    Happy travels!

  • Kingston’s Dye tops in watermelon-carving contest

    Kingston’s Nanthawan Dye was recently awarded second place in the 2014 Watermelon Carving Contest.

    Dye’s entry, which took honors in the “Most Elegant” category, was among the elegantly etched and creatively carved watermelons from across the globe submitted for the contest, sponsored by the National Watermelon Promotion Board.

    “We were wowed by the nearly 100 contest submissions this year — the most we’ve ever received,” said Stephanie Barlow, National Watermelon Promotion Board director of PR and social media.

  • Fall Happenings 2014

    Festivals
    • The second annual Senior Street Fair, a partnership between Rockwood Housing Authority and Mid-East Community Action Agency, will be from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Oct. 24 on West Rockwood Street, Rockwood, in front of Martin Manor Apartments. Music, an Elvis impersonator, a chili and cornbread competition for seniors, vendors, marshmallow roast, cake walks and other activities are planned. A warming center will be inside Martin Manor for those needing to get in from the cold.

  • Harriman Happenings: Oct. 20

    This past week Carolyn Clemmons spent several days with her son, Roy Clemmons and his family.

    They went to Octoberfest and the Shriner’s Circus in Nashville Municipal Auditorium.

    Carolyn’s grandson, Tennessee, is 22 months old.

    They went to church and ate at Demos Restaurant. It was a fun filled weekend.

    My niece Cheryl Childress celebrated her birthday Oct. 11. Happy birthday Cheryl. I’m sure you had a blessed and happy day.

  • Roane State’s Classroom under the Sea looks at invasive species in sea

    The lionfish invasion and sharks will be topics for the Oct. 23 episode of Classroom Under the Sea.

    One of the most destructive forces in the ocean today is a fish. One of the most misunderstood fish in the ocean is known for its destructive force.

    The lionfish and the shark will be the topics of the next episode of “Classroom Under the Sea,” an online lecture series hosted by two educators living underwater for 73 days.