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Community News

  • Amendment details to be outlined at GOP women’s picnic

    Four amendments to be on the Nov. 4 ballot will be discussed during the Roane County Republican Women’s annual picnic.

    The picnic will be on Sept. 25 at Roane County Park shed 2 at 3515 Roane State Hwy., Midtown.

    Hamburgers and hot dogs will be served starting at 5 p.m.; the Roane County Republican Women will provide desserts and side dishes.

    Cost is $7.50 per person.

    Republican legislators have been invited to speak on the amendments.

  • Shadrich Jones family to dedicate grave marker

    The family of Shadrich Jones will commemorate his service in the War of 1812 with a military service and gravestone dedication this weekend.

    “We do not know if he had a proper funeral and are pretty sure he didn’t have a military funeral,” said Pat Pierce-Goss of Harriman, one of Jones’ descendants.

    Family and guests are asked to arrive at Weidemann Hotel in Deer Lodge between 9:15 and 10:15 a.m. Sept. 27 to be shuttled to the grave site off Meister Hills Road in Deer Lodge, Morgan County.

  • Harriman Happenings

    Visitors at St. Mary’s Baptist Church last Sunday were Brian Farmer, his friend Penney, her daughter Natalie, and Brian’s daughter Madison.

    Also, his mother Carol Farmer was with them.

    They were blessed and said they will be back.

    Emmitte Yette, a former resident of this city, will celebrate his birthday the 26th of this month. Happy birthday, Emmette, and be blessed.

  • Bus tour bringing Tennessee first lady here

    Tennessee first lady Crissy Haslam will be in Roane County today — Sept. 19 — as part of the Governor’s Books From Birth 10th anniversary statewide bus tour.

    Haslam and the special bus will be here beginning at 2 p.m. at Harriman’s Pinnacle Pointe shopping center on Hwy. 70 in Midtown.

    The event is free and open to the public.

    Children’s activities and registration for Roane Imagination Library will be available.

  • Artists sought for Street Painting Fest

    Anyone who enjoys drawing upon his artistic skills while sketching a face, animal or colorful scene might like “painting” pictures in chalk on a sidewalk.

    Such artists are encouraged to sign up for the 15th annual Oak Ridge Street Painting Festival.

    This festival will be from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Oct. 4 (rain day on Oct. 5) on the sidewalks of the Oak Ridge campus of Roane State Community College on Briarcliff Avenue.

    Artists may start their chalk paintings on the afternoon of Oct. 3.

  • Get ready to indicate interest in arts grants

    East Tennessee Foundation will begin accepting letters of intent for its Arts Fund grants programs on Oct. 1.

    Organizations must be tax-exempt 501(c)(3) organizations or other exempt entities in order to be eligible for funding.

    Available grants range from $5,000-$15,000

    and will be awarded to support two-year pro-

    jects.

    Letters of intent must be submitted online to the Foundation no later than Nov. 3.

    A select number of organizations will be invited to submit full proposals early next year.

  • Lots to see and do at Kingston Country Fair

    Kingston Country Fair organizers are touting this year’s annual event as “the largest craft fair in Roane County.”

    The festivities, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Oct. 4 at Southwest Point at 1226 S. Kentucky St., feature a collection of some of the finest handcrafters in East Tennessee.

    Admission is free. Door prizes will be given away each hour throughout the day.

    Attractions also include a classic car show, 4-H shows with a petting zoo, horse and riding demonstrations.

  • The Garden Gate: Wreaths are reminders of never-ending circle

    The circle is an ancient symbol for eternity.

    A circle has no beginning — and no end. Wreaths and wedding rings express this symbol.

    Pliny wrote a book, “Natural History” in ancient times. From that, we learn the many market gardens of Athens supplied the city with flowers, vegetables and wreaths.

    The flowers were raised mainly for garland and wreath makers. They formed a distinct trade.

    Wreaths were an important part of every festive occasion in ancient times. They were used to adorn statues and altars.

  • Nominations sought for state arts awards

    The Tennessee Arts Commission is accepting nominations for the 2015 Governor’s Arts Awards.

    The awards are Tennessee’s highest honor in the arts. They recognize individuals and organizations that have made significant contributions to cultural life.

    “The awards provide an opportunity to recognize the state’s rich cultural heritage, and reward creative excellence in the arts,” said Anne Pope, executive director of the Tennessee Arts Commission.

  • Family fun planned at Bethel fall festival

    Family-oriented fun for all ages is on tap at Bethel Presbyterian Church’s annual fall festival.

    This year’s festival will be on Sept. 20, with breakfast, marketplace, live entertainment, children’s activities, café and fried pies.

    All proceeds from this year’s festival will benefit the Michael Dunn Center, Mid-East Community Action Agency’s senior nutrition program and Second Harvest Food Bank’s backpack program.

    The church is at 203 S. Kentucky St., Kingston.