.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Community News

  • The Garden Gate: What’s in a name? A lot, when it comes to gardening

    Editor’s note: As Ellen Probert Williams continues her respite, we share one of her classic columns, first published on Oct. 3, 2012.

    Many of the rollicking medieval names for plants have been lost in favor of more prosaic titles, but think how exuberant a garden would be planted with such things as Bouncing Bet, Sweet Sultan, Bobbing Joan, Lustie Gallant, Gardener’s Garters or Glare of the Garden.

  • Y-12 emergency management exercise Oct. 15

    Emergency management personnel from Y-12 National Security Complex, along with state, federal and area emergency management personnel, will conduct an exercise Oct. 15 at Y-12’s New Hope Center.

    Because of the activities associated with the exercise, New Hope Center on Scarboro Road will be closed to the public from 8 a.m. to noon.

    East Portal Road from Scarboro Road, up to and including Portal 13, will also be closed from 8 a.m. to noon.

    The exercise should be completed by late morning or early afternoon.

  • Fall Happenings

    Festivals
    • Rockwood First Presbyterian Church will have its annual Halloween cookout and hayride from 6 to 9 p.m. Oct. 29. Food, family-oriented fun and games and Christian fellowship are planned. The church is at 429 W. Rockwood St.

  • Harriman Happenings-Oct. 13

    Sincere sympathy to the family of Mary Ann Jackson, who recently passed away at Harriman Care and Rehabilitation Center at the age of 105.

    She lived a very long life and was a Christian lady.

    Her parents preceded her in death and a brother.

    Norma DeArmond (Carl) was her caregiver, and she really helped care of her.

    Mary left other cousins and family members behind.

    Service was held for her Thursday with Dr. Joseph Weaver officiating.

  • Key new programs to help farmers manage risk

    U.S. Department of Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack recently unveiled highly anticipated new programs to help farmers better manage risk, ushering in one of the most significant reforms to U.S. farm programs in decades.

    Vilsack said new tools are now available to help provide farmers the information they need to choose the new safety net program that is right for their business.

  • Enroll now for dairy farm risk management

    Tennessee farmers can enroll in the new dairy Margin Protection Program.

    The voluntary program, established by the 2014 Farm Bill, provides financial assistance to participating farmers when the margin — the difference between the price of milk and feed costs — falls below the coverage level selected by the farmer.

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture also launched a new Web tool to help producers determine the level of coverage under the Margin Protection Program that will provide them with the strongest safety net under a variety of conditions.

  • The Garden Gate: Gardens tell the story of our great history

    Editor’s note: As Ellen Probert Williams continues her respite, we share one of her classic columns, first published on Oct. 5, 2011.

    There is little, when one thinks about it, that is

    new in gardening. Much of it is actually very old indeed.

    The terraced gardens of skyscraper city apartments hark back to the hanging gardens of Babylon.

    The stepped-back-style of city architecture traces its roots to the Aztecs, Incas and Biblical times.

    In addition to providing sunlight and air, it creates terraces for gardens.

  • Historic figures passed through the Obed region

    Obed Wild and Scenic River will present an Oct. 11 ranger program about three famous people who once visited the Obed area.

    Both legend and evidence combine to show that Andrew Jackson, John Muir and Daniel Boone each trekked across the environs of Morgan County and what is now the Obed Wild and Scenic River.

    A park ranger will present information on each of their visits and will focus on primary source writings and journal entries from centuries past.

  • Two meetings set for Kingston homeowners

    Aid to Distressed Families of Appalachian Counties and the city of Kingston will have two public meetings on Oct. 9 with Kingston homeowners whose homes sustained damage during the June 10 tornado/straight-line winds.

    Ralph M. Perrey, Tennessee Housing Development Agency executive director, will be at the first meeting, from 10 a.m. to noon in Kingston City Hall at 900 Waterford Place.

    Another meeting, from 4 to 6 p.m., will be in Kingston Community Center at 201 Patton Ferry Road.

  • Orange you glad you’re a Vol? These kids are

    Students at The Henry Center show their orange pride prior to the Tennessee/Arkansas game earlier in the season.