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Community News

  • The Garden Gate: Fearsome plants haunt us all the year through

    Fearsome plants abound in Halloween lore and call to mind the legend of a poison garden rumored to have been part of the estate of Italy’s famous Borgia family in the 16th century, a time when poisoning was the preferred way of dealing with enemies and worrisome competitors.

  • Kingston Lions Club kicks off White Cane Days

    Kingston Lions Club this week will begin its annual campaign for raising funds for district projects.

    The drive is called White Cane Days, because the white cane is symbolic of aid to the blind.

    Some of the specific projects funded by the drive are East Tennessee Lions Eye Bank, Leader Dog for the Blind, Lions Volunteer Blind Industries, Tennessee School for the Blind and Tennessee School for the Deaf.

    These projects are representative of how the Lions use their motto: We Serve.

  • Harriman Happenings: Oct. 29

    Happy birthday to Janie Clemons, who celebrated her 86th birthday last Saturday.

    Her children who live out of town and those who are here came together and gave their mother a birthday dinner. Sheila Smith was included because she is like a daughter to Janie.

    Janie was one happy mother. Having her children home with her and all enjoying the meal that was prepared just for her.

  • Program aims to aid vets with housing

    The Department of Veteran’s Affairs has awarded grants to the Tennessee Valley Coalition to End Homelessness to serve veterans and their families who are homeless or at risk of homelessness.

    Roane County veterans can benefit from the Supportive Services for Veteran’s Families Program that promotes housing stability among very low income veteran families who live  in or are transitioning to permanent housing.

    Service provided include outreach, case management, and assistance in applying for VA and other benefits.

  • Development District honors senator

    State Sen. Ken Yager, R-Harriman, has been recognized by the Tennessee Development District for legislative achievements benefitting the people of the 12th Senatorial District and the state.

    Yager received the award last month at a meeting of the East Tennessee Development District in Knoxville.

    East Tennessee Development District is a voluntary association of 56 municipal and sixteen county governments in the mid-east region of Tennessee. The Tennessee Development District is an association of all nine districts throughout the state.

  • Medicare enrollment help offered

    The National Open Enrollment period for Medicare is under way through Dec. 7 and impacts more than 1.2 beneficiaries in Tennessee.

    Most of these beneficiaries will also be impacted by changes that are being made to their Medicare benefits, said Jim Shulman, executive director of Tennessee Commission on Aging and Disability.

  • Claims due from Hispanic and women alleging discrimination

    Hispanic and women farmers and ranchers who allege discrimination by the USDA in past decades can file claims through March 25.  

    “Hispanic and women farmers who believe they have faced discriminatory practices from the USDA must file a claim by March 25, 2013 in order to have a chance to receive a cash payment or loan forgiveness,” said U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack.

  • Look Back: A Little Something From Our Files From the Week of Oct. 24

    25 Years Ago
    The Last Patrol, a group of Vietnam veterans and other concerned individuals, carried various flags as they walked through Roane County on their way to Washington, D.C. The group started their 1,600-mile walk from the Alamo in San Antonio for the purpose of organizing veteran voter registration and promoting public awareness of the plight of POW/MIAs.

    10 Years Ago

  • The Garden GATE: This berry can weigh hundreds of pounds

    Using pumpkins as jack-o’-lanterns for Halloween is an American idea — an adaption of the medieval custom of making lanterns out of hollowed-out turnips.

    Those in medieval England, Scotland and Ireland believed elves, ghosts and fairies haunted the Earth. It was customary to build huge bonfires to ward them off.

    The early jack-o’-lanterns contained fires to protect the house. They were small and made from the big yellow turnips we call rutabagas.

  • Chattanooga steam engine chugging up to Harriman

    The Tennessee Valley Railroad Museum is planning a special 160-mile steam engine excursion from Chattanooga to Harriman and back next month.

    On Sunday, Nov. 11, the former Southern Railway’s Engine No. 630 will leave from Chattanooga for Harriman  at 8:30 a.m. as the train passes over Norfolk Southern main lines.

    Passengers will stay on board the train at Harriman and the train is expected back at Chattanooga around 4:30 p.m.

    The steam engine also is making a slightly longer trip to Attalla, Ala., on Saturday, Nov. 10.