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Community News

  • Kingston native Coffman to read poetry from new book

    Kingston native Lisa Coffman will be in Knoxville on Oct. 8 for a poetry reading from her new book, “Less Obvious Gods,” published this past spring by Iris Press.  

    The reading will start at 6 p.m. in Union Avenue Books at 517 Union Ave.

    Coffman, a 1981 graduate of Roane County High School, lives in Los Osos, Calif., near the mission town of San Luis Obispo.

    She teaches at California Polytechnic State University.

  • Thanks to The Dream Connection, Keagan Davis gets dream game room

    Twelve-year-old Keagan Davis of Kingston recently had a dream come true, thanks to the East Tennessee children’s charity The Dream Connection.

    Keagan has a rare congenital heart disease. In July, he underwent open heart surgery at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville.

    Keagan was referred to The Dream Connection, a nonprofit organization which grants dreams to children faced with daunting health problems.

  • Writing workshop set

    Cookeville freelance writer and newspaper columnist Jennie Ivey will conduct an all-day writing workshop on “When the Byline Loses Its Thrill: Making Money with the Words You Write” on Nov. 9 in the United Way of Anderson County office at 161 Robertsville Road, Oak Ridge.
    The event is the Tennessee Mountain Writers fall workshop.
    Workshop participants will be taught how to focus on subjects they want to write about and tailor writing to fit markets that pay.

  • Turkey shoot aids South Roane VFD

    South Roane County Volunteer Fire Department will have a fundraising turkey shoot on Oct. 12.
    The shoot will begin at 9 a.m.  at the Renfro Fire Station on River Road, Ten Mile.
    “Of course, no actual turkeys will be shot,” said Administrative Chief Butch Barding. “We shoot at targets, and the shot that gets closest to the target wins the round.”
    Shooting is open to men, women and children.

  • Kingston shutterbug Sims heads up Arts Council

    New board members were elected, and changes to the charter were made, during the annual meeting of the Arts Council of Roane County.

  • Wheat lives on for those who called it home

    By Bonita Irwin • For Roane Newspapers
    Alumni of the former Wheat High School and old Roane College, as well as former residents of the former Wheat community, will celebrate 82 years of homecomings at the George Jones Church on Oct. 6.

    The service will begin at 11 a.m., with John Stair Jr. bringing the message. A covered-dish dinner will be at noon under the nearby tent.

    The community of Wheat, situated near the K-25 Site, was first known as Bald Hill because all of the timber had been cut to construct houses.

  • One-man show to give Lincoln, Twain stances on Civil War

    “Abe Lincoln, Mark Twain and the Civil War,” a one-man theatrical production, will take place Oct. 9 in Kingston Public Library at 1004 Bradford Way.

    The historical, humorous and educational program will start at 6 p.m.

    Dave Ehlert will portray both Lincoln and Twain in this 90-minute production, which tells how a Union president and a Confederate deserter fought against slavery in both pre- and post-war days.

    Call the library at 376-9905 for details.

  • Look Back: A Little Something From Our Files From the Week of Oct. 2

    25 Years Ago
    Thelma Hughes, an employee at Kayser-Roth in Rockwood, was honored for her 45 years of service to the company. She was presented with a certificate by her supervisor, Ronnie Rhea, and a Gatsby wall clock by human resources manager Lygetta Travis and plant manager Ed Foster. Hughes worked in knitting for 33 years and switched over to quality control, the job she held on her milestone anniversary. An avid University of Tennessee Volunteers fan, the Rockwood native and her husband, Edgar Hughes, were the parents of a daughter, Gena Stinnett.

  • The Garden Gate: Have chocolate to feel like royalty

    Tradition holds that the ancient Aztec emperor Motecuhzoma was so addicted to “chocoatl,” the sacred beverage made from cocoa beans, that he consumed 50 golden goblets of it a day.

    The earliest cocoa trees probably grew in the tropical lowlands of Central America and Mexico. An ancient Toltec myth gives credit to the feathered serpent god Quetzalcoatl for first planting these trees and bringing chocolate, food of the gods, to human beings.

  • Harriman Happenings Sept. 30

    Sincere sympathy to Glenn Hickman and other loved ones in the recent passing of Glenn’s mother, who lived in Asheville, N.C.
    She was the wife of the late Rev. Hickman, a former pastor of New Century United Methodist Church. Services are incomplete at this writing.
    We express our deepest sympathy to Mary Jane and Kenneth Brown and all family members in the recent passing of their 3-year-old grandson in Memphis.