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Community News

  • Look Back: Something From Our Files From the Week of July 17

    25 Years Ago
    Roane State Community College students, faculty and staff were introduced to Sherry Hoppe, the college’s interim president. Hoppe took the reins from Cuyler Dunbar, the college’s founding president who accepted the lead role at Catawba Valley Community College in Hickory, N.C. “I hope to continue being responsive to the community needs — to continue the tradition that Mr. Dunbar has set,” said Hoppe, whose stint at the college was said to be anywhere from six months to a year.

  • Second Chance clinic helps Roane pets

    Canines of all breeds, shapes and sizes accompanied their owners to Roane County Park late last month for a special clinic courtesy of Second Chance K-9 Rescue.

    Vaccinations for rabies and distemper/parvo were offered, and animals could also be tested for heart worm or feline leukemia.

    The clinic was in conjunction with Prevent A Litter Connection Inc.

  • Roane Choral recipient of state arts grant

    Roane Choral Society has been awarded a $4,100 grant by the Tennessee Arts Commission.

    The $4,100 grant is made possible through an appropriation of state funds by the General Assembly, federal dollars from the National Endowment for the Arts, and by Tennesseans who buy specialty license plates.

    “This is a very fine performing arts group,” said state Sen. Ken Yager, R-Harriman.

    “I am very pleased this grant has been awarded for this purpose.”

  • Kingston gets kudos for progress

    Big projects in small towns are often a sign dedication and teamwork are at play — and the city of Kingston has been cited as a shining example.

    As good stewards of grant funding, the city is advancing toward economically sound development in the areas of energy, the environment, water source delivery, recreation and services, ensuring citizens reap the savings and benefits for years to come.

    The city’s drive to move ahead has earned it the Tennessee Municipal League’s Small City Progress Award.

  • The Garden Gate: Thyme is on our side, and has been for ages

    Thyme is one of the most popular herbs used in food preparation and medicine. It is interesting to note that it has been thus for many thousands of years.

    Thyme is native to most of Europe. It grows wild from Spain to Siberia, especially in the Alpine regions. It came to this country with our earliest settlers and now grows wild in many states. It is the most prolific herb to be found growing wild in the northern regions of the Catskill Mountains.

  • On vacation with the Roane Couny News
  • Register now to attend emergency management forum

    Online registration is open to the public for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge Office and the Tennessee Emergency Management Agency’s 10th Oak Ridge Emergency Management Forum set for Sept. 26 at the New Hope Center.
    This year’s forum theme, “Back to Basics: Partnerships in Emergency Management,” will feature general session speaker Richard Serino, deputy administrator of the Federal Emergency Management Agency who will speak on current innovations in emergency management partnerships.

  • Backstrom takes pride in success of PT program

    Kurt Backstrom could name hundreds of times his Roane State Community College students made him proud during his long career as director of the college’s physical therapist assistant program.
    One of his favorite moments happened this spring, Backstrom’s last as program director.
    For an honors project, two students developed detailed plans for the program’s future, and they presented their ideas to college faculty and staff.
    When Backstrom heard their presentation, he knew he had another proud moment to add to his list.

  • Keahey, Gray certified in crisis intervention

    Rockwood Police Department officers Randy Keahey and Dwayne Gray recently completed crisis intervention training and are now certified as CIT officers.
    The Rockwood officers were among the fifth class for CIT East Tennessee, which offers training in conjunction with the Oak Ridge Police Department and Ridgeview Behavioral Health Center, a not-for-profit community mental health center with offices in Harriman.

  • Harriman Happenings: July 15

    The Rev. Alvin Douglass was the guest speaker for the senior saints at Little Leaf Baptist Church in Oliver Springs.
    Twelve members were present, and all enjoyed his message. Afterward, they enjoyed a light lunch. This is where Elder Dews is pastor.
    Get-well wishes to Helen Roddy, who recently had eye surgery.
    Permelia Anderson spent two weeks in Stone Mountain, Ga., visiting her daughter, Pam Wright and her granddaughter, Stephanie Wright.