.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Community News

  • The Garden Gate: Colorful cabbage more than a ho-hum veggie

    It is hard to really know how far back in time people have been eating cabbage. Now we eat cabbage in soups, stews, salads and casseroles without realizing our kinship to all the people in all the countries and all the eras in history who have done the very same thing.

    Cabbage is mentioned in many places in the Bible with full descriptions of gardens and crops, and even some methods of cooking and preserving this versatile vegetable.

  • Look Back: A Little Something From Our Files From the Week of Sept. 5

    25 Years Ago
    Harriman’s last dime store closed its doors for the final time. Clarence Hall and his wife, Frances, owned and operated Hall’s Dime Store on Roane Street for 35 years. Age and Clarence’s back injury a few years earlier helped to determine the couple’s retirement plans. Said Clarence, “If you can’t do it right, it’s time to let it go.”

    10 Years Ago

  • Quilts galore at upcoming October Sky Fest

    By Leota Wallick, for Roane Newspapers

    Quilts through the ages have been used to provide warmth for our bodies, store memories of our past, deliver blessings to families as babies are born and marriages take place, to deliver directions to those using the Underground Railroad and for other reasons too numerous for this short article.

    Quilts will be displayed  at the 2012 October Sky Festival in Oliver Springs to emphasize their importance in our heritage.

  • Kids Dream Big for Harriman’s reading program

    The Harriman Public Library 2012 Summer Reading Program, Dream Big: Read, was a vision of wonderful books read.

    There were 2,836 books read during the five programs. The program had 75 children registered.

    In the first program, the National Park Service from the Scenic Obed River sent Patrick Smith to intrigue the children with stories and pictures of canoeing, rock climbing and animals at this national park.

    The youth of Kingston First Baptist Church entertained with a puppet show in the second program.

  • OR heritage group to hear two special presentations Sept. 13

    The Oak Ridge Heritage and Preservation Association will hear two special presentations during its monthly meeting on Sept. 13.

    The meeting starts at 7 p.m. in Midtown Community Center.

    Jim Campbell, president of the East Tennessee Economic Council and Fellow of the University of Tennessee's Howard Baker Center for Public Policy, will present a preview of his portion of “Secret City in the Tennessee Hills: From Dogpatch to Nuclear Power,” a symposium at the National Archives at Atlanta.

  • Safety Fest coming to Oak Ridge Sept. 11-14

    Oak Ridge Business Safety Partnership’s inaugural Oak Ridge Safety Fest is planned for Sept. 11-14.

    Tennessee Technology Center at Harriman, Roane State Community College and New Hope Center will be the site of the various sessions.

  • Railway Museum to run its last dinner train for season Sept. 15

    Southern Appalachia Railway Museum’s schedule for September includes one-hour narrated excursions on Sept. 1 and Sept. 15.

    The one-hour narrated excursions depart at 11 a.m., 1 and 3 p.m. both Saturdays.

    During the ride, passengers will hear the story of the Manhattan Project, which was one of the most remarkable industrial achievements ever accomplished.

    Regular ticket prices are $13 for ages 3-12 and $17 for adults.

  • The Garden Gate: Nature’s getting ready for fall

    The hydrangea is one of the loveliest of summer flowers that linger on into fall.

    It flourishes in either full sun or part shade, and in borders or containers. This old-fashioned bloom has been making a come back in popularity and is again available in a range of cultivars.

    Native to woodlands in both North and South America and East Asia, hydrangeas include more than 80 species of evergreen and deciduous shrubs and vines. Probably the best known and one of the most popular examples is the hydrangea macrophyllas.

  • Look Back: A Little Something From Our Files From the Week of Aug. 29

    25 Years Ago
    Cee Bee Food Store in Rockwood was advertising the following: Castleberry Beef Stew, 89 cents for a 24-ounce can; boneless chuck roast for $1.39 a pound; half gallon of Kay’s ice cream for $1.79; a gallon of 4-percent milk for $1.89; a 2-pound loaf of Kerns bread for 89 cents; and smoked hams for $1.19 a pound. Every Tuesday, seniors 62 and older received a 7 percent discount.

    10 Years Ago

  • Time for Music and Melons at Harriman Riverfront Park

    The annual Music and Melons celebration, presented by Babahatchie Community Band and Harriman Lions Club, will start at 3 p.m. Aug. 26 at Harriman Riverfront Park.

    Harriman Lions Club members will slice and distribute free slices of cold watermelon against a backdrop of Americana-defining music performed in Sunday afternoon concert style by the Babahatchie Community Band.

    Concert admission and watermelon are free.