Community News

  • Harriman police looking for a few good reservists

    For those who have dreamed of becoming a law enforcement officer but never had the opportunity, now is the chance.

    The Harriman Police Department is seeking qualified people for its Reserve Police Program.

    “We are looking for people who have the interest, passion and the desire to keep our citizens and neighbors safe,” said Police Chief Randy Heidle.

    The Reserve Police Program is comprised of community members who volunteer their time to fulfill many of the roles handled by full-time sworn police officers.

  • Second Chance sets rabies clinic

    Second Chance K-9 Rescue will have a rabies clinic from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. June 29 at Roane County Park, Midtown.

    Vaccines available include first-year rabies for $12, three-year rabies for $20 and distemper/parvo for $10.

    In addition, testing for heart worm and feline leukemia will be available at a cost of $20 per pet beginning at 10:30 a.m.

    Heart worm preventative will be available for purchase after testing.

    Cost of the preventative is dependent on the dog’s weight.

  • The Garden Gate: Yucca, aloe still magical and mysterious wonders

    Have you noticed how many gardens are featuring the tall, heavily blossom-laden stalks of yuccas?

    Perhaps you don’t call them yuccas. You may know them by one of their many aliases: Spanish bayonet, desert candle, moon candle, Adam’s needle, manihot, cassava or manioc.

  • Saturday’s Day in Park with Artists

    Arts Council of Roane County will have A Day in the Park with Artists from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. June 29 in Roane County Park pavilion 2.

    The event is a celebration of the arts with  area artists, fine crafters and performers.

    Public admission is free; refreshments will be available.

    Email artscouncilofroanecounty@gmail.com for details or booth reservations.

  • Look Back: A Little Something From Our Files From the Week of June 26

    25 Years Ago

  • Look Back: A Little Something From Our Files for the Week of June 19

    25 Years Ago

  • Library, United Way to promote literacy with puppet shows, stories

    Kingston Public Library will host Roane County United Way’s Day of Action on June 21 to promote literacy in imaginative, fun ways.

    The free event from 9 a.m. to noon in the library at 1004 Bradford Way, will include puppet shows, storytime and prizes.

    Activities start with a 4-H bug program at 9. Puppet shows at 9:30 and 10:30 will focus on sun and stranger safety, and the United Way’s storytime at 10 will be “Love You Forever.”

  • Holocaust survivor to speak at library

    Kingston Public Library and Roane Writers Group will present “A Hidden Child” on June 20 as part of the Thursdays at the Library program.

    Sonja DuBois, who was born in the Netherlands and became an orphan at 22 months, will share her experiences during and after the Holocaust.

    The free program will begin at 6 p.m. in the library at 1004 Bradford Way.

    A reception will follow.Call 376-9005 for details.

  • Ham radio operators to meet for Field Day

    Roane County amateur radio operators will give a public demonstration of emergency communications during annual Field Day exercises June 22-23  at Fort Southwest Point , Kingston.

    Despite the Internet, cellphones, email and modern communications, whole regions of the world find themselves in the dark. Tornadoes, fires, storms, ice and even the occasional cutting of fiber-optic cables leave people without the means to communicate.

    In these cases, the one consistent service that has never failed has been amateur radio.

  • The Garden Gate: Breathe easier by ramping up your daily intake of garlic

    Garlic is a member of the Alium family, which includes onions, leeks, shallots and chives.

    It is related to the flowering Amaryllis — the name of which is derived from the ancient Latin word for garlic.

    As a genus, garlic includes several hundred species, some of them native to most of North America. It is also native to central Asia and was introduced to the rest of the world by early immigrants.