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Community News

  • ’Round Rockwood

    By Josephine McKinney
    It has been a time of unpredictable weather. Plenty of showers, just cloudy Tuesday, then Wednesday a rainy day.

    We enjoyed having our family together recently: all four of our children, Steven and Bonnie of Rockwood, Joe and Kathleen of Chesapeake, Va., Nina and Randy Swafford, Carrie and Matt Dukes of Crossville, David and Wanda McKinney, Jeff and Sharon McCarroll of Lenoir City, for a covered-dish dinner. Also Alta Lewis, Dannise and Roger McKinney and son Roger of Harriman.

  • Explore Antarctica here in East Tenn.

    Explore the Antarctic environment and the working life of scientists on Earth’s coldest, highest, driest and windiest continent in a special exhibition, “Antarctica: Where Science Is Cool,” on display until March 11 at the American Museum of Science and Energy in Oak Ridge.

    Museum visitors can try on cold weather Antarctic gear, view photographs, maps and graphs, use a computer interface and visit with a museum staff member who has worked on the southernmost continent.

  • The Garden Gate: Rugs remind of Paradise to come

    Surrounded by rivers, lakes and streams as we are in this part of Tennessee, it is hard for us to realize how important water — and the oasis it makes possible — is in the arid desert regions of much of the world.

    Persia as far back as the seventh century was larger than present-day Iran and included Turkestan and Iraq.

    Back then, a part of the Islamic faith was that the garden represented Paradise or heaven.

    Water was abundant in this garden, filled with trees for shade from the merciless heat and flowers that would never fade.

  • Arlington errors painful reminder

    By Freddy Groves
    King Features Syndicate

    In early December, when the Wreaths Across America program put wreaths on graves at Arlington National Cemetery, I flashed back to the ongoing problem of the graves errors at the cemetery: unmarked graves, headstones with no remains, broken urns with scattered remains, graves with more than one person buried in them.

    The problems, it was thought at the time, could involve upward of 6,000 graves.

    Congress demanded that the Army “provide an accounting” of all the gravesites at Arlington.

  • Rockwood Cub Scouts staying busy

     

  • THP to conduct sobriety check in Roane County

    The Tennessee Highway Patrol will conduct a  sobriety checkpoint from 10 to 11 p.m. Jan. 20 on Hwy. 58 at the new bridge.
    Recognizing the danger presented to the public by intoxicated drivers, troopers will concentrate their efforts on vehicles being operated by intoxicated drivers.
    The Tennessee Highway Patrol has found these sobriety checkpoints to be an effective means of enforcing DUI laws of Tennessee while ensuring the protection of all motorists.

  • Soup’s On! for center that aids Roane

    The seventh annual Soup’s On! for the Kids First Child Advocacy Center of the Ninth Judicial District will be on Jan. 25 in Tellico Village Community Church’s Christian life center.

    Lunch and dinner will be served during the event to raise funds for the nonprofit agency that serves severely abused children and their nonoffending family members in Roane, Loudon, Morgan and Meigs counties.

    Tickets are $10 in advance, $12 at the door for lunch from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. or dinner from 4:30 to 7 p.m.

  • Look Back: A little something from our files

    25 Years Ago
    Harriman City Council unanimously passed a resolution to borrow $3.1 million for a new wastewater treatment facility. The state ordered the city to have a new facility operating by July 1988 in order to meet new clean water regulations. The amount of the Harriman Utility Board sewer rate increases would depend on the price of the bids and how many grants the city could obtain. Initial estimates ranged from 35- to 80-percent rate increases.

    10 Years Ago

  • Kingston Lions planting trees

    Lions Club members all over the world are planting trees to signify to the public the presence of Lions in their communities while replacing trees lost by tornadoes, tsunamis and disasters.

    The goal is to plant more 1 million trees to represent one tree for each member of Lions Clubs International.

    The program has been a great success — more than 4.2 million trees have already been planted, and more are planted each day.

  • The Garden Gate: Old-time herbalists knew how to treat aches, pains

    By Ellen Probert Williamson
    In January the Cree Indians say, “This is the time the world changes, the time when you can be transformed. You are the center fire. You are the flowering tree. The whole of a human’s life is watched by the thunder chiefs. You have a road within you, a turquoise road. Move your spirit on your turquoise road.”