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Religion

  • Apply for yearly Garden Grants starting April 1

    Roane County Cooperative Ministries will continue its April 1 tradition next week by kicking off its Garden Grants program.

    The program helps pay for starting a vegetable garden. Grants can be used to cover the cost of seeds, plants and one bag of fertilizer.

  • Club’s Palm Sunday service in Rockwood

    Harriman Music Club’s annual community Palm Sunday service will start at 2:30 p.m. March 29 in Rockwood United Methodist Church.

    The church is at 801 N. Kingston Ave.

    “Vocal and instrumental soloists, ensembles and choirs from the community churches and schools will provide musical selections in remembrance of this day,” said Julianne Bailey, Harriman Music Club spokeswoman.

    “Please plan to attend this uplifting performance.”

    Harriman Music Club was founded more than 100 years ago.

  • Calvary’s Blend to sing

    Calvary’s Blend from Chattanooga will be this month’s special guests for Rockwood’s Singing in the City, hosted by Victorious.

    The free concert will start at 6 p.m. March 28 in Rockwood Event Center at 116 W. Rockwood St.

    The Roane County Travelers Band will perform some of Gospel music’s old-time favorites.

    Refreshments are available in the dinner-theater-style setting.

    Call Dudley Evans at 245-8152 for details.

  • Church Calendar: March 28-April 5

    SATURDAY, MARCH 28
    • The youth of Cowan Chapel United Methodist Church, Kingston, will have a fundraising chicken and fish dinner beginning at 11 a.m. in the church at 606 Greenwood St. Cost is $10 a plate, $6 a sandwich or $1.50 per wing, in a quantity of four, six or 10 wings; each dinner includes pinto beans, cole slaw, cornbread, drink and dessert. Meals may be eaten at the church, or delivery is available by calling 376-0630. All proceeds benefit the church’s youth.

  • Church mother trio cited for community impact

    Three women who are respected church mothers in their congregations were recently honored for their impact on their communities.

    Progressive Citizens of Roane County, a new entity in the area, selected Minnie Love, Lillian Eskridge and Alma Fletcher for Distinguished Citizen Awards and honored them at an event at Harriman’s Bazeltown Baptist Church.

    Love, known for her fighting spirit, was recognized with the Distinguished Citizen Award for determination.

  • St. Andrew’s kicking off Lent season

    Two events at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church in Harriman will mark the beginning of preparation for the most important holy day of the Christian Year — Easter.

    On Tuesday, Feb. 17, an annual feast of pancakes will be served from 5 to 7 p.m.

    The following day, traditional Ash Wednesday services will be at noon and 7 p.m.

  • Old-mountain remedies seminar set

    Health educator Walt Cross of Newport will present a free Old Mountain Remedies workshop from 6 to 8:45 p.m. Feb. 12 in the fellowship hall of Roane Seventh-day Adventist Church at 336 Patton Lane.

    The needs of East Tennessee families were cared for with old-mountain remedies for generations. From golden-seal to corn silk, these herbs were and continue to be common medications.

  • New Post Oak pastor

    Post Oak Baptist Church, Rockwood, welcomes Jimmy Turpin as the church’s new pastor.

    Turpin and his wife, Tammy, have two children, Cheyenne and Dakota.

    The church is on Joiner Hollow Road.

  • ‘Philadelphia Eleven’ priest to speak during Episcopal symposium

    The Episcopal Churchwomen of the Diocese of East Tennessee will present a symposium on the celebration of the 40th anniversary of the ordination of women in the Episcopal Church.

    “Telling the Stories” will be on Feb. 21 in Knoxville’s Episcopal Church of the Ascension at 800 Northshore Drive.

    Registration begins at 9 a.m. The program starts with coffee and pastries at 9:30.

  • Luminary United Methodist plans Jan. 25 healing service

    Thanks in part to televangelists, Christian worship services centered on healing have gotten a bad rap in recent years.

    “We need to learn to re-embrace this tradition,” said Chuck Griffin, pastor of Luminary United Methodist Church in Ten Mile.

    “Christ healed people as evidence of the kingdom’s presence in this world,” Griffin said, “and Christ continues to heal through the Holy Spirit today.”