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Today's Features

  • The unique Obed River gorge of the Cumberland Plateau will be discussed during a 6:15 p.m. Dec. 17 program in The United Church, The Chapel on the Hill, at 85 Kentucky Ave., Oak Ridge.

    Interpretive Ranger Veronica Greear will discuss the Obed Wild and Scenic River, notable for its biodiversity, supporting a diversity of ecosystems that are unique to this river system.

    Following the presentation, the Obed Wild and Scenic River’s Visitor Center film: The Obed: Find Yourself Here award winning short movie will be shown.

  • Roane State Community College is among the key organizations across the state that has been awarded funding through the Labor Education Alignment Program.

    The program is a state effort focused on increasing opportunities for Tennesseans to obtain a certificate or degree beyond high school that is aligned with the needs of the workforce in their communities.

    Roane State was awarded $970,000 as part of the program.

  • State Sen. Ken Yager, left, is the newest member of the Michael Dunn Center board of directors.

    He is welcomed to the board by Michael Dunn Center President and CEO Mike McElhinney, center, and Jim Pinkerton, board chairman.

  • Stage-fighting students at Pellissippi State Community College took their unique combat skills to the next level when they performed recently for the East Tennessee Renaissance Festival in Harriman.

    “Our stage-fighting course is unique in Tennessee,” said Charles R. Miller, the college’s theater program coordinator and a professor of liberal arts. “We have one of the top two-year theater programs in the country.”

    Students in the stage-fighting course learn the skills to perform mock combat for theatrical purposes.

  • Avery Trace Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution recently honored Marla “Jill” McMaster for her outstanding contributions both nationally and to the Roane County community.

    The National Society Daughters of the American Revolution’s American History Committee sponsors a Women in American History recognition award and encourages each to select a notable woman from its state or community to honor.

  • Connie Williams, a member of Kingston’s Southwest Point Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution, recently completed requirements to become the chapter’s genealogy consultant.

    DAR genealogy consultants must complete three units of the organization’s Genealogical Education Program.

    The first unit, Introduction to Genealogy Research for DAR Applications, consists of lessons in evaluation of evidence, vital records, Census records, state and local records, federal records, family and parochial records, and DAR records.

  • Sincere sympathy is extended to the family of Lillian Alberta Mitchell, who recently passed away at her home.

    She was married to the late Eugene Mitchell Jr.

    She was the mother of several children.

    There are 11 grandchildren, 30 great grandchildren and two great-great-grandchildren.

    She was a cousin to the Douglass family, and she was a good friend of mine.

    She also had a host of other relatives and friends. She was a faithful member of Foster Chapel Baptist Church.

    Pastor Joseph Tolbert officiated her service.

  • The devastation of coral reefs will be the topic of the next episode of “Classroom Under the Sea,” an online lecture series hosted by two educators living underwater for more than two months.

    The live program starts at 1 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 4.

    Viewers can watch live at roanestate.edu/classroomunderthesea and on youtube.com/classroomunderthesea.

    Roane State Community College biology professor Bruce Cantrell and adjunct professor Jessica Fain are living and working in an underwater habitat for 73 days.

  • State Rep. Ron Travis has recently made a donation in support of Tennessee Wildlife Federation’s Hunters for the Hungry program.

    Travis’ donation will cover the cost of deer processing in his area, House District 31, which includes part of Rockwood.

    Hunters for the Hungry provides funding to 79 wild game processors across 63 Tennessee counties.

    The processors receive donated venison from hunters during whitetail deer season, package the lean, organic meat for free or at a reduced rate, and make it available to area food banks and kitchens.

  • Mid-East Community Action Agency will have its quarterly distribution of USDA commodity foods next month.

    The distribution will be in Harriman Church of God at 3106 Roane State Hwy., Midtown.

    Harriman and Kingston residents will pick up their foods from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Dec. 4.

    The food pick up for Oliver Springs and Rockwood residents will be from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Dec. 5.

    Commodity food recipients should be certified.

    Those receiving the foods are advised to bring a bag in which to carry the food.