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Today's Features

  • Roane Community Seventh-day Adventist Church had its homecoming on April 7 in commemoration of the 10th anniversary of the official opening and dedication of its worship center.

    The center, at 336 Patton Lane adjacent to Roane State Community College, was opened on April 6, 2002.

    Former pastors George Sharpe and Rob Clayton participated in the homecoming service, during which the church gave thanks to the living Christ for all that He has provided for them.

  • Three Nails Artist Management will host a spring bash at Roane County Park Saturday, April 14.

    “This thing has taken off like a rollercoaster,” said Donnie Manis, who is funding the event.

    “Basically this is a kick-off to something that will probably grow.”

    The free spring bash will include food; music from the management’s bands Stutterbox, Common Clay Worship, Affliction Asylum and Encounter Eternal; and preaching from Greg Carlyle of Potter’s House Fellowship.

  • Kingston First Baptist Church is hosting a community event on April 14 designed specifically for women.

    Girls Night Out — a nation-wide program filled with fun, faith and fellowship — welcomes women from all backgrounds to share in God’s love by engaging them with humor and inspiring them with hope.

    The evening brings women together to celebrate who God created them to be.

  • The beautiful iris, the state flower of Tennessee, blooms in so many different colors. It was named after Iris, the personification of the rainbow in Greek mythology.

    There are about 200 species of iris to be found in the northern temperate zone. Native to Asia, about 30 different species grow wild in the eastern United States and in the the Mississippi Delta.

    They are a part of the family which includes freesia, crocus and gladiolus.

  • Roane County 4-H, Kingston Police and Fire Departments, Kingston Explorers, state Rep. Julia Hurley, Harry Wampler of Wampler’s Farm and Elm Hill and Sharon Pinner of Hands of Mercy rest during a recent successful springtime food drive and fun event for Hands of Mercy’s food pantry.

    Two truckloads of canned goods were collected, and more than 400 people participated and were given a free hot-dog lunch, courtesy of Wampler’s Farm Sausage.

    A petting zoo and face painting were also part of the attractions.

  • East Tennessee Human Resource Agency will sponsor the Summer Food Program in Roane and other East Tennessee counties this summer.

    The Summer Food Program is a federally funded free food program made available to all children when school is not in session.

    The purpose of this program is to make good nutritious meals available to children throughout the summer months.

    ETHRA contracts with food vendors in each county to prepare meals daily for this program.

  • Madison Paige Smythe of Kingston is among the 56 young women from throughout East Tennessee who will be presented during the Dogwood Ball.

    The 50th annual ball of the East Tennessee Presentation Society will be on April 21 in Knoxville Coliseum.

    Smythe is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Louis Smythe of Kingston.

    She is a sophomore at Pellissippi State Community College, Knoxville.

  • Madison and Miciah Caruthers celebrated their 14th birthday Saturday, March 31.

    They live in Murfreesboro but celebrated their special day in Nashville.

    Their grandparents, Spencer and Judy Anderson from Harriman, joined them for their special day along with their mother, LaToya.

    They spent the day at Opry Mills shopping. Later they dined at Dave & Buster’s Restaurant. Judy said the food was great.

    After the meal, Madison and Miciah had fun and played games in part of the restaurant.

  • 25 Years Ago
    A one-night occupant of a cell in the Rockwood Safety Department was not incarcerated, but just passing through. V.A. Kelly, 72, of Illinois, was about two months into his walk around the world. He usually spent his nights in jails or firehouses. A widower, Kelley hoped to meet people, visit family and explore his great-grandfather’s birthplace. But his biggest goal was to try and locate prisoners of war and soldiers listed as missing in action. He guessed his journey would take five years, more or less.

  • Ethel Plemens turned 102 years old on April 3.

    She celebrated with her children, grandchildren, great-grandchildren, nieces, nephews and friends at Renaissance Terrace on March 31.

    Plemens has been a resident of Renaissance Terrace, Harriman, for the last few years.

    Until about a year and a half ago, she walked with the aid of only a cane. She would walk the halls and visit other residents there.  

    She continues to have an ever-ready smile for family, friends and staff.