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Today's Features

  • Mid-East Community Action Agency will have its quarterly distribution of USDA commodity foods this month.

    The schedule is:

    • Kingston Community Center, from 10 a.m. to noon March 21.

    • Mount Pisgah Baptist Church, Oliver Springs, from 2 to 3 p.m. March 21.

    • Harriman Community Center, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. March 22.

    • Rockwood National Guard Armory, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. March 23.

  • Andrea McCall recently served as a page in the state Senate.  

    McCall, a student at Jefferson Middle School in Oak Ridge, was the guest of state Sen. Ken Yager, R-Harriman, and state Sen. Randy McNally, R-Oak Ridge.

    McCall was accompanied to the Capitol by her aunt and uncle, Teresa and Joseph Van Hook.

    Yager issued an invitation earlier this year for area students to experience the legislature in action as a page in the State Senate.

  • Mid-East Community Action Agency Senior Services Department will sponsor the AARP driver safety training program March 22-23 in the Mid-East office at 1362 N. Gateway Ave., Rockwood.

    The two-day class will be from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. both days.

    Another two-day class is planned for March 28-29. That class will be from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. both days in Kingston Public Library at 1004 Bradford Way.

  • The Tennessee Farm Service Agency reminds farmers and producers of the April 1 deadline for obtaining non-insured crop disaster assistance coverage on mixed grass pasture for the crop year 2012.  

    The program was designed to reduce financial losses that occur when natural disasters cause a catastrophic loss of production or prevented planting of an eligible crop by providing coverage equivalent to catastrophic insurance.

  • American Museum of Science and Energy visitors have opportunities to learn the life cycle of a house, visit the lighting test table, and play the energy game at the “Sustainable Shelter: Dwelling Within The Forces of Nature” exhibition.

    The exhibit is open  through April 30 at the museum at 300 S. Tulane Ave., Oak Ridge.

    Museum visitors will be able to explore three key building materials — wood, steel and concrete — and the path each takes from its origin in the earth to its use in the home.

  • By Louise Warmley, Community correspondent
    Last Saturday, the sanctuary was filled with people who attended the Black History Program at Anointed Praise and Worship Church.

    Lots of youth from different churches took part in this service. Mary Alice Douglas was the best; she played the part of an old lady who grew up in Tupelo, Miss., and she told how things were then and how they are now. She encouraged the youth to get all the education they can and make the best of it.

  • Babahatchie Community Band will honor “March King” John Philip Sousa with the opening number at its March 4 concert.

    The concert begins at 3 p.m. in Harriman High School auditorium. Admission is free.

    Sousa’s “Liberty Bell March was originally written for his unfinished operetta the Devil’s Deputy but financing for the production fell through, said band member Alison Westrich.

  • Ava Barber, a featured performer on “The Lawrence Welk Show,” will be the guest performer next week during the meeting of Kingston First Baptist Church’s Young at Heart.

    The meeting will begin at 10:30 a.m. March 5 in the church’s family life center at 215 N. Kentucky St.

    The program is open to the public. Those attending are asked to bring a covered dish or dessert for the meal afterward.

  • By Julia Hopper Daniel, For Roane Newspapers
    Samuel William Harper, president of the Knoxville College class of 1942, made a farewell speech entitled, “Looking Back with Chins Up,” on May 25, 1942.

    “The class of ‘42 will scatter after this day and will embark in various professions,” he said. “Some of us will be immediately united with our brothers in the armed forces of the nation, others will teach, and others will continue in graduate work.”

  • By Ellen Probert Williamson
    Is it possible that you are a dowser or, as dowsers are sometimes called, a water witch?

    Dowsing is an ancient craft using branches of the witch hazel or willow tree to locate the presence of underground water. The dowser holds a wishbone-shaped, forked branch straight out before him and walks up and down, back and forth, over the terrain where he hopes to find a water source and construct a well.

    Not everyone has this ability. Perhaps you do.