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Today's Features

  • Experts with the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture are sounding the alarm on a tiny new pest that can cause significant damage to many fruit crops.

    The spotted wing drosophila is a vinegar fly (sometimes inaccurately called a fruit fly) from Asia. It was first detected in California in 2008. In 2011, the fly had reached blueberries in East Tennessee. By 2013 SWD damage had spread to 23 Tennessee counties, from Greene County in the east to Gibson County in the west.

  • Tom Clipner of Midway recently grew a 1-foot-long white radish in his garden on Loudon Hwy.

    Pastor of Maranatha Ministries of Midway, he said he used a lot of prayer to grow the bountiful harvest.

    "No spray or anything special — just prayer," he said, adding that God has blessed his garden.

  • Rockwood 2000 will have a Patriots Day ceremony from 9 to 10 a.m. Sept. 11 at Homecoming Park in downtown Rockwood.

    Military veterans, emergency personnel and community individuals will be honored, and a special tribute is planned for those who perished on Sept. 11, 2001.

    Special guest speakers and patriotic musical entertainment are planned.

    The event will also include a dedication of Memory Lane paver bricks.

    The bricks are offered at a special reduced price through Aug. 5.

  • Kingston Public Library will have free Saturday computer classes June 28 through July.

    A Microsoft Word class will be from 9:30-10:25 a.m., with a PowerPoint class from 10:30-11:25 a.m.

    Seating is limited; call 376-9905.

  • 25 Years Ago

  • Tickets are now on sale for the Atomic Blast, Oak Ridge’s one-of-a-kind fundraiser for the Free Medical Clinic of Oak Ridge.

    The fundraiser will be on Aug. 16 in the Parish Life Center of St. Mary’s Church at 327 Vermont Ave., Oak Ridge.

    The evening will include dinner, dancing to live entertainment, live and silent auctions, and a “celebrity dance contest.”

    Included with wine and beer for purchase will be the new “Atomic Blast Signature Drink.”

  • We think of celery as an ingredient in soups, salads and snacks.

    Amazingly, it is mentioned repeatedly in the Bible as a remedy for some serious health problems. It has held an important place in medical use since about 500 B.C., when it was part of the pharmacopeia of ancient Egypt.

    Celery is mentioned a number of times in the Talmud, the 39 books of Biblical commentary dating from the 1st century, as a remedy for infections and tumors, as well as a cure for gout.

  • A number of area women have met for several years for Dessert Bridge Day each Tuesday afternoon.

    The members of this group include, from left, Sue Nunley, Peggy Cook, Louise Shipwash, Sydney Woodfin, Carol Poston, Anne Barre, Luci Bell and Anne Horner.

    Poston, standing, was hostess for a recent event, and she served a pineapple cream cheese pie with a crumbled pretzel crust.

  • Babies born at Methodist Medical Center, Oak Ridge, to Roane County parents:
    May 8 — Brandy and Matthew Hunter, Oliver Springs. A girl, Ivory Rosemarie, 9 pounds, 1 ounce. Grandparents: Peggy Silvey; James Silvey; Teresa Jenkins, Randall Campbell; Victoria Toomey.

    May 9 —Aubrey Bentz, Kingston. A girl, Autum Gracelynn, 9 pounds, 0 ounces. Grandparents: Teresa Davis; Michael Bentz.

  • The Skin Cancer Foundation’s Road To Healthy Skin Tour will make a stop at Kingston Rite-Aid this week to offer free full-body skin cancer screenings to the public.

    Two private examination rooms will be available in a specially designed vehicle.

    Members of the public may stop by for screenings from 1 to 4 p.m. June 26 at Kingston Rite-Aid at 106 W. Race St.