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Today's Features

  • Savannah Grant, 2011 Rockwood High School homecoming queen, was among the homecoming queens around the nation invited to the 53rd AutoZone Liberty Bowl in Memphis.

    Grant was among the Tennessee representatives participating asked to go to Memphis to partici-
    pate in the pre-game and half time show with headliners KC & the Sunshine Band.

    The Cincinnati Bearcats are this year’s AutoZone Liberty Bowl champions after toppling the Van-
    derbilt Commodores 31-24.

  • By Ellen Probert Williamson
    Parsley is a small green plant native to Southern Europe. There are more than 30 varieties of it.

    We usually think of it as merely a garnish for other foods, but there is much more to it than you might think.

    The parsley family is a large one. It includes many herbs, some spices and common vegetables, such as carrots and celery.

    Some of its relatives are anise, dill, angelica, chervil, coriander and caraway, cumin, fennel, lovage, and sweet cicely.

  • 25 Years Ago
    Noncarbon, a high tech plant in the Roane County Industrial Park, announced plans to reduce inventory and stop total production. Product sales were to continue, but an estimated 25 employees were to be laid off. Officials would not comment on whether this was temporary or permanent situation.

    10 Years Ago

  • By Louise Warmley
    Anointed Praise and Worship’s choir anniversary was well attended, and those who made this service so great were Men of Praise, Grace, Douglass Family Singers, Rodney and Shannon, and Shaddi.

    All of these singers sang with the anointing.

    Kiersten Douglass is the new president for 2012. All who attended were blessed.

  • By Josephine McKinney
    It has been a time of unpredictable weather. Plenty of showers, just cloudy Tuesday, then Wednesday a rainy day.

    We enjoyed having our family together recently: all four of our children, Steven and Bonnie of Rockwood, Joe and Kathleen of Chesapeake, Va., Nina and Randy Swafford, Carrie and Matt Dukes of Crossville, David and Wanda McKinney, Jeff and Sharon McCarroll of Lenoir City, for a covered-dish dinner. Also Alta Lewis, Dannise and Roger McKinney and son Roger of Harriman.

  • Explore the Antarctic environment and the working life of scientists on Earth’s coldest, highest, driest and windiest continent in a special exhibition, “Antarctica: Where Science Is Cool,” on display until March 11 at the American Museum of Science and Energy in Oak Ridge.

    Museum visitors can try on cold weather Antarctic gear, view photographs, maps and graphs, use a computer interface and visit with a museum staff member who has worked on the southernmost continent.

  • Beech Park Baptist Church in Oliver Springs will honor its pastor and his family at 6 p.m. Jan. 15.

    The Rev. Robbie Leach has served as senior pastor for the last 10 years.

    The celebration is open to church members, friends and the community.

    A reception will follow after a time of acknowledgment and appreciation in the sanctuary.

  • A four-day winter revival will be Jan. 15-18 in the Windmill Inn Bed and Breakfast in Oliver Springs.

    Russ Cooper of Vonore will be guest speaker for the services, which begin at 6 p.m. Sunday and at 6:30 p.m. Monday through Wednesday.

    There will be special music each night, including Julia Smith, Sonya Craze and Tiffany Martin.

    Casual attire is appropriate.

    The Windmill B&B is at 606 Butler Miller Mill Road, just west of the Dollar General Store in Oliver Springs.  

  • Midtown Church of God has named Jesse H. Youngblood as its new pastor.

    Youngblood said he and his wife, Melissa, “are committed to growing a fellowship of believers to become spiritually balanced in the Word, Worship and the Holy Spirit's power for living everyday lives.”

    Services begin at 11 a.m. each Sunday, and Younblood said plans are to begin Sunday night services in the near future.

    The church is at 565 Keylon Drive.

  • Surrounded by rivers, lakes and streams as we are in this part of Tennessee, it is hard for us to realize how important water — and the oasis it makes possible — is in the arid desert regions of much of the world.

    Persia as far back as the seventh century was larger than present-day Iran and included Turkestan and Iraq.

    Back then, a part of the Islamic faith was that the garden represented Paradise or heaven.

    Water was abundant in this garden, filled with trees for shade from the merciless heat and flowers that would never fade.