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Today's Features

  • The enrollment deadline for the 2012 and 2013 U.S. Department of Agriculture emergency assistance for Livestock, Honeybees and Farm-Raised Fish Program (ELAP) has been extended to Aug. 15.

    Originally, program sign-up was scheduled to end Aug. 1, said USDA Farm SErvice Agency Administrator Juan M. Garcia.

    The new deadline gives livestock, honeybee, and farm-raised fish producers who experienced losses because of disease, adverse weather, wildfires or colony collapse disorder between Oct. 1, 2011, and Sept. 30, 2013, an additional two weeks to enroll in ELAP.

  • Cookbooks were just as popular in ancient Rome as they are today.

    It is truly amazing to see how many cookbooks are on the shelves of any bookstore.

    Amazingly enough, they haven’t really changed much, and cooking has always been as much of a hobby as it is now.

    The most famous of surviving ancient cookbooks was written by Gavius Apicius, who lived at the time of Tiberius.

    The writer Seneca tells us that Apicius one day counted up his fortune and found that he had spent 100 million sesterces, mainly on food.

  • Kingston was one of the stops for Pete Stadalsky and Nolan McClelland, who are paddling 1,000 miles from the Smoky Mountains to the Gulf of Mexico to benefit American Diabetes Association.

    The Kingston stop was on the Fourth of July.

    Stadalsky and McClelland are on a 70-day journey, and they hope to raise at least $10,000 for the American Diabetes Association.

    Visit www.paddletocurediabetes.com for more details about their adventure.

  • Cody Anderson and Brittany Carlberg took the Roane County News on its next vacation adventure with a trip to Yellowstone National Park in Montana.

    Anderson said the pair traveled through six states to reach their destination.

    Planning a vacation? Take your Roane County News along and pose with it to be included in an upcoming issue.

    Be sure to tell us where you — and the News — traveled for a break and photo.

    You may drop off photos at the newspaper office at 204 Franklin St., Kingston, or email to newsroom@roanecounty.com.

  • Roane Countians have an opportunity to be screened to reduce their risks of having a stroke or bone fracture.

    Kingston Church of Christ’s family life center will host a University of Tennessee Medical Center Life Line screening on Aug. 11. The site is at 120 W. Spring St.

    “I want to thank you very much, because this screening saved my life,” said Mary Davis of Oliver Springs about a recent Life Line screening.

    Stroke is the third-leading cause of death and a leading cause of permanent disability.

  • East Tennessee Preservation Alliance is now accepting nominations for the 2014 East Tennessee Preservation Awards.

    The awards recognize outstanding individuals, organizations and projects contributing to historic preservation efforts within the 16-county ETPA region, which includes Roane County.

    The awards will be presented during the awards banquet, in conjunction with the East Tennessee Preservation Conference, on Nov. 6 in Oak Ridge.

  • Babies born at Methodist Medical Center, Oak Ridge, to Roane County parents:
    July 11 — Amy Lankford, Harriman. A boy, Blake, 6 pounds, 4 ounces. Sibling: Brock. Grandparents: Carol Lankford; Larry Mullenix.

    July 17 — Reagan Palmer and Chris Turpin, Oliver Springs. A boy, Connor Preston, 7 pounds, 9 ounces. Grandparents: Neda Foster; William Palmer Jr.; Turpin and Edna Turpin.

  • The Living Light Solar House, an ambassador for good design and energy efficiency while at the University of Tennessee, is now open to the public at the Children’s Museum of Oak Ridge.

    This newest exhibit was built by University of Tennessee students.

    UT donated the solar house to the Children’s Museum, where it arrived May 17.

    The new exhibit invites children and families to experience sustainability in an energy-efficient house recognized for its architectural design.

  • An abandoned well drilled in the early 1900s on the banks of the Obed River has been plugged through a collaborative effort between Emory River Watershed Association, Tennessee Valley Authority, Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency and the National Park Service.

    The well was at Potter’s Ford in the Catoosa Wildlife Management Area.

    Project funding was obtained by the Emory River Watershed Association from the Tennessee Valley Authority’s Environmental Restoration and Enhancement Project Program.

  • Classes to learn flower arranging are popular all over the world, and this great interest in flower artistry has led to the development of a great number of related industries.

    Within the last 30 years or so, the British, by their own account, have had a tremendous revival of interest in this ancient art.

    It has touched thousands of lives, raised the standards of floristry and caused a great revival of interest in the flower paintings, flower containers, books about the history of flowers and their uses, and in the development of new plants.