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Today's Features

  • Siblings Brock and Kiera Leffew of Kingston started a birthday tradition last year, when they asked family and friends to make donations to The Dream Connection in lieu of buying them gifts.

    The tradition continued this year, with party-goers at the siblings’ pool party at Kingston Community Center giving more than $600 — triple last year’s donation — to the charity.

    The Dream Connection is an East Tennessee-based children’s charity that fulfills dreams of children who are faced with life-threatening or debilitating illnesses.

  • Kingston native Myra Humphrey will present her children’s book, “Pliny the Mouse,” during Kingston Public Library’s next Thursday Night at the Library program.

    The program will start at 6 p.m. Aug. 21 in the library at 1004 Bradford Way.

    Seeking shelter from the cold, Pliny embarks on a fictitious grand adventure that’s based on a true account of an incident at Kingston First Baptist Church.

    Characters in the “Pliny” story share similarities with church organist Nancy Skidmore and Pastor Sonny Works.

  • Farmers and ranchers still have time to apply for low interest 2014 U.S. Department of Agriculture loans available through Tennessee Farm Service Agency’s direct farm ownership program.

    The deadline to submit applications is Sept. 30.

    Eligible producers can borrow up to $300,000 in direct farm ownership loans to buy or enlarge a farm, construct new farm buildings or improve structures, pay closing costs, or promote soil and water conservation and protection.

  • Obed Wild and Scenic River will host an Art in the Park reception beginning at 5 p.m. Aug. 22 in the Obed Visitor Center at 208 N. Maiden St. in downtown Wartburg.

    The event will include a display of photographs from the recent Obed photography contest.

    During the evening, the contest’s winning entries will be revealed.

    The Shelter Road Band will provide a range of Americana, rock and country music as light refreshments are served.

  • Considering the widespread and still-growing interested in gardening, it is not surprising how often the dividing lines between herbs, flowers and weeds become somewhat blurred.

    Some of the plants considered to be the worst weeds turn out to be the most valuable of medicinal herbs, and some of the prettiest of the old-fashioned flowers our grandmothers carefully tended in their gardens turn out now to be classified as weeds.

    It all depends on just what angle you are looking from and what you call it.

  • The Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation is once again partnering with the Tennessee Stormwater Association, the Tennessee Valley Authority and the Tennessee Department of Transportation to offer a grant program designed to help local governments fund green infrastructure and low-impact development projects.

    A total of $103,080 in grant funds will be available for allocation this year.

  • The Internal Revenue Service and the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration continue to hear from taxpayers who have received unsolicited calls from individuals demanding payment while fraudulently claiming to be from the IRS.

    Based on the 90,000 complaints that TIGTA has received through its telephone hotline, to date, approximately 1,100 victims have lost an estimated $5 million from these scams.

    “There are clear warning signs about these scams, which continue at high levels throughout the nation,” said IRS Commissioner John Koskinen.

  • New Midway Baptist Church had a community outreach program with its fish camp on Aug. 2 on the Eblen farm on New Midway Road, Kingston.

    The fish camp, in conjunction with Roane County Farm Bureau, was attended by about 400 people.

    The day started at 9 a.m. with registration for a fishing contest sponsored by Anglers for Christ.

    The contest was open to ages 2-18, and club members were available to help the children during the competition.

  • Salvation 2014, a youth conference, will start at 6 p.m. Aug. 23 in the Princess Theatre in downtown Harriman.

    The conference will include area youth, as well as those outside the county.

    Admission is dry or canned goods.

  • Want to see 10 award-winning films from 10 countries? Find genealogy information on the Internet? Learn about female Pharaohs in ancient Egypt?

    Better understand tax law changes, Medicare, long-term care services and investment fundamentals? Get a new perspective on Jesus, the Trinity and the Quakers? Learn to analyze dreams and play better bridge?

    Courses on these and other topics will be offered during the fall semester of Oak Ridge Institute for Continued Learning.