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Today's Features

  • Want to see 10 award-winning films from 10 countries? Find genealogy information on the Internet? Learn about female Pharaohs in ancient Egypt?

    Better understand tax law changes, Medicare, long-term care services and investment fundamentals? Get a new perspective on Jesus, the Trinity and the Quakers? Learn to analyze dreams and play better bridge?

    Courses on these and other topics will be offered during the fall semester of Oak Ridge Institute for Continued Learning.

  • The city of Oak Ridge and the American Museum of Science and Energy Foundation will have the second in a series of community meetings from 6 to 8 p.m. Aug. 19.

    The meeting will be in the museum at 300 S. Tulane Ave., Oak Ridge.

    Registration and light refreshments will be available beginning at 5:30 p.m.

    Executives from several regional museums and attractions will discuss how their museums were established and developed, and how each is managed and operated.

  • Joyce Sapp likes cucumbers, and she grew them this summer in her yard on Post Oak Road near Rockwood.

    But she recently decided she’d had her fill for the summer. While getting rid of the vines, she found her biggest harvest of all — a green, curved cuke that measures 18 inches long if measured end to end inside the curve.

    “I wasn’t trying to grow anything other than cucumbers,” she said of her late-summer find. “At any rate, it’s the biggest one I’ve ever seen.”

  • Crusaders arriving in the Holy Land in the 12th century learned, to their amazement, that apples were not native to the area.

    Apples were supposedly the forbidden fruit of the Garden of Eden, so the Crusaders thought the translators of the Bible were mistaken, and some other fruit was intended.

    Many researchers today believe it was the apricot, but the Crusaders of that century thought it was the big, yellow, citrus fruit they called the pomelo.

    This tropical fruit would grow in England, but it flourished in the islands of the Caribbean.

  • Vanderbilt researchers last week reported updated find-

    ings regarding the benefits of behavior-focused therapies for children with autism spectrum disorder.

    The review, conducted by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality-funded Vanderbilt Evidence-based Practice Center, updates a prior systematic review of interventions for children (up to age 12) with a focus on recent studies of behavioral interventions.

  • Get-well wishes to Becky Robinson, who is a patient in Fort Sanders hospital in Knoxville.

    Let’s keep her in our prayers.

    Our deepest belated sympathy is extended to the family of Michael A. Blanchard, who recently passed away.

    He was a lover of people and had many friends.

    His father was Byron Blanchard, who was a great worker for United Way of Roane County.

    He is survived by his mother, Virginia Bry-

    son Blanchard of Kingston; his wife, June; a

    sister and brother and other relatives and friends.

  • Tennessee is 36th this year in the annual Kids Count National Data Book ranking on child well-being.

    The ranking is better than in 2013, when Tennessee ranked 39th.

    The state is among the five states with the biggest improvements in overall rankings from 2013 to 2014.

    The Data Book rates states on four domains: economic well-being, education, health and family and community.

    Each domain is comprised of four measures.

  • Called Out Quartet will sing during the 11 a.m. service at Childs Memorial Baptist Church, Harriman.

    The church is at 402 Childs Road.

    The group includes Scott Russell, Jess Birdwell, Darnell Collier and Von Gaines.

    Called Out Quartet was formed in 2003, with all four members attending the same church in Hendersonville.

    Call 931-250-3567 for more about Called Out Quartet’s Harriman singing.

  • A number of area singers will be featured this weekend during the second annual C.S. “Sonny” Harvey Memorial Gospel Singing.

    The event will begin at 6 p.m. Aug. 9 in the former Beech Park activity building on Butler Mill Road, Oliver Springs.

  • Rockwood United Methodist Church is celebrating 50 years of serving the Rockwood community at its present location at North Kingston Avenue and Dunn Street.

    The church service will start at 10:30 a.m., followed by a luncheon.

    Special music and shared memories are planned for 2 p.m. in the church sanctuary.

    The first formal services in the present building were on Aug. 2, 1964, with Pastor John W. Wikle and guest ministers from the Holston Conference participating.