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Today's Features

  • A free informational meeting for those interested in becoming volunteers with Human Animal Bond in Tennessee will be from 6 to 8 p.m. Aug. 5 in Episcopal Church of the Resurrection, Loudon.

    Doors open at 5:30 for registration.

    HABIT is an animal-assisted therapy program. It is a non-profit group of volunteers working together to promote the bond between people and animals.

  • Obed Wild and Scenic River will have two programs on Aug. 2.

    Join National Park Service rangers for a free cup of coffee and informational session at Lilly Bridge from 10 to 10:30 a.m.

    The Climb With a Ranger program will be from 11 a.m.

    to 3 p.m., beginning at Lilly Bridge.

    The park will provide all gear for rock climbing. Those participating should bring drinking water and sturdy footwear.

    Depending on participant interests and ability levels, participants will travel to one of several different climbing areas around the park.

  • Piano students of Nancy Skidmore and vocal students of Tommy Taylor recently performed in a recital in Kingston First Baptist Church.

    The students, with their teachers, are, front row from left, Levi Parish, Avery Parish, Savannah Turpin, Jacqueline Turpin; second row, Skidmore, Rebekah Sanders, Skye Clemmons, Toby Taylor, Declan Brewer, Tucker King; third row, Sophie King, Cynthia Roberts, Mary Beth Oliver; and back row, J.B. King, Emma Barnett, Jacob Mincke, Lauren Baggett, Rachael Baggett and Taylor.

  • Kentucky native and author Donald Curtis will speak during Thursday Night at the Library on July 31.

    The free program starts at 6 p.m. in the library at 1004 Bradford Way.

    Curtis is the author of “And Should We Die …” which tells the story of the Cane Creek Massacre.

    The incident is a little-known massacre of a Mormon congregation by members of the Ku Klux Klan in 1884 Lewis County.

    Curtis will have copies of his book on hand for purchase.

  • Second Opinion, a group of Methodist Medical Center physicians and friends who perform classic rock, will provide music for dancing during the Aug. 16 Atomic Blast, the annual fundraiser for the Free Medical Clinic of Oak Ridge, which serves Roane County.

    The fundraiser will be from 5 to 10 p.m. in the parish life center of St. Mary’s Church at 327 Vermont Ave. It will include a catered dinner, Celebrity Dance Contest and live auction.

  • The Teen Board of Knoxville has invited 10 Roane Countians to be presented during the 54th annual Teen Board Presentation Dance on Sept. 27.

    Teens are presented during the annual black-tie event as a reward for completing hours of service to civic and welfare projects for charitable organizations in their community.

    Presentees include:

    HARRIMAN

    • Carly Brown, a student at Harriman High School. Her parents are Levie and Misty Brown.

  • After more than 37 years of service, Staff Sgt. Thomas Greene retired from 278th Armored Cavalry Regiment, (Tennessee Army National Guard) at the end of June.

    The Roane County native began his military career in October 1977, when he joined the old Company D in Oak Ridge as a ground surveillance radar operator.

    “I was 23 when I joined,” said Greene, who lives in Dyllis near Harriman with his wife, the former Sandi Bright of Loudon.

  • Richard and Sarah Lawson of Oliver Springs will celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary this week.

    The couple was married on Aug. 1, 1964.

    The Lawsons’ family includes Michael, Tina, Chris, John, Jared, Summer, Anna, Josh, Rusty “Lil’ Man” and five cats.

    “We love you and celebrate these wonderful 50 years with you,” family members said. “You are very very important to each and every one of us.”

  • The celebration of life of Mrs. Clyo E. Keene was last Wednesday, July 16, at Ewing Brothers Funeral Home.

    She was a member of West Street African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church in Carlisle, Pa.

    She was the widow of the late Thomas L. Keene.

    During their marriage, they enjoyed traveling, with some of her favorite places being Australia, Italy and Germany.

    She enjoyed being in the company of her church and family and sharing the love of God.

    She was born and raised in Harriman and passed at 102 years of age.

  • For the second consecutive year, the Tennessee Bar Association earned the top public service award from the Tennessee Society of Association Executives.

    “The Legal Handbook for Tennessee Seniors” won the Association’s Advance Tennessee Award as the best public service project by an association in the state.

    The award was presented last week at a luncheon in Nashville.

    The TBA’s Public Education Committee created the handbook earlier this year and is continuing to conduct outreach and education across the state.