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Today's Features

  • James Griffith has accepted the call to lead the ministry of Dyllis Baptist Church, Harriman, as pastor.

    Griffith, a native of Morgan County, began his pastoral duties the church on Aug. 17.

    He is a graduate of the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, holding a Master of Divinity in Christian ministry degree.

    He also holds a Doctorate of Pharmacy degree from Creighton University in Omaha, Neb.

    Prior to his duties at Dyllis Baptist Church, Griffith served as associate pastor of Eubank Baptist Church in Eubank, Ky.

  • Folk Mountain Gospel artists Don and Donna Mohl will make a return visit to Roane Community Adventist Church at 7 p.m. Sept. 17.

    The Mohls use folk mountain music and heart-warming stories to encourage and inspire.

    Their unique style of music blends biblical and traditional instruments, such as hammered dulcimer, bowed psaltery, zither, mountain dulcimer, mandolin and guitar with their voices.

    CDs, DVDs and handcrafted biblical musical instruments will be available for sale after the program.

  • Caney Ford Baptist Church, Midtown, is celebrating its 143rd homecoming anniversary and the 60th anniversary of its current building.

    Former members and friends are welcome to the celebration service at 11 a.m. Sept. 14. Former pastor Rev. Mark McCoig will be speaking.

    McCoig is among 28 pastors who have served the church. The Rev. Taylor Phelps is current pastor.

    Caney Ford Baptist Church was organized in April 1870. Laymen of the church preached until a pastor was called in March 1871.

  • For the dedicated gardener, anywhere is likely to be a spot to plant something — and anything is a likely container to plant it in.

    It isn’t necessary to have an acre of land to have a garden.

    For millions of people — apartment dwellers, people who live on houseboats, people whose occupations keep them on the road in campers and mobile homes — even a small plot is not available.

    Container gardening is the answer.

  • Oak Ridge Heritage and Preservation Association members and the public are encouraged to celebrate the organization’s 15th anniversary during a reception on Sept. 11.

    The reception will be from 6 to 8 p.m. in the “Midway Gatehouse” — site of the group’s original meeting — on Scarboro Road, near the Y-12 Plant.

    Refreshments, displays and opportunities to view the historic building and its artifacts will be available.

  • Roane State Community College and the Oak Ridge Institute for Continued Learning are jointly launching a free intergenerational lecture series open to the public.

    James L. “Jamie” Cotton Jr., author of “The Greatest Speech, Ever: The Remarkable Story of Abraham Lincoln and His Gettysburg Address,” will give the first lecture in the inaugural series.

    The lecture will begin at 3:30 p.m. Sept. 18 in the lecture room in the new Goff Health Sciences and Technology building on Roane State’s Oak Ridge campus.

  • Abuse of prescription opioids — or pain medications — is the No. 1 drug problem for Tennesseans receiving publicly funded assistance for treatment services, according to statistics recently released by the Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services.

    Over the past decade, substance abuse admissions for prescription drugs like hydrocodone, oxycodone, morphine and methadone have increased 500 percent, the statistics show.

  • Midway High School’s class of 1962 had a 52-year reunion last month.

    The classmates also celebrated their 70th birthdays during the event in Paint Rock Church’s fellowship hall.

  • Rockwood 2000 will have a Patriots Day ceremony from 9 to 10 a.m. Sept. 11 at Homecoming Park in downtown Rockwood.

    Military veterans, emergency personnel, community individuals and those who perished on Sept. 11, 2001, will be honored.

    The event will include a dedication of Memory Lane paver bricks at the park.

    The bricks were offered at a reduced cost during the summer.

  • The week of Sept. 15-19 marks the ninth annual University of Tennessee vs. University of Florida blood drive competition

    Medic Regional Blood Center encourages all eligible donors and Vol fans to roll up their sleeves and give for the home team.

    “This friendly competition helps us increase our inventory and have fun with the football rivalry at the same time,” said Mike Prowell, Medic business development director.

    Medic will have a blood drive from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sept. 19 in Roane Medical Center’s Stowers Rotary Community Room.