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Today's Features

  • Wesley Colyer and Michelle Hreha Colyer of Kingston announce the forthcoming marriage of their daughter, Heather Anne Colyer, to Zachary Zeigler.

    He is the son of Terry and Marge Thompson and Tom Zeigler of Kingston.

    The ceremony will be on June 14 at Scott-Ellis Pavilion in Kingston.

    The bride-elect is the granddaughter of the late William and Mary Colyer, and Maria Hreha of Kingston and the late Stephen Hreha.

    She is a 2009 graduate of Midway High School and is a current student at Roane State Community College.

  • Mankind has sought to outwit nature since the beginning of gardening.

    There is something fascinating about having summer flowers in winter and enjoying fruits and vegetables out of their seasons.

    Forcing plants and building greenhouses have become sophisticated arts, despite the advent of modern transportation capable of bringing us fruits, flowers and vegetables from other climes so that the seasons no longer really matter.

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  • Pastor Jesse Sr. and Elfredia Williams celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary Tuesday, May 27.

    Pastor Williams was in the Air Force stationed in Alaska. Elfredia was a student at the University of Tennessee.

    When he was on leave, he and Elfredia were married by the late Rev. C.W. Matthew in Mount Calvary Baptist Church.

    Afterward, Pastor Williams was stationed in California. After his discharge from the Air Force, they made their home in Knoxville.

    They are parents of two children, Lourenda Pryor and Jesse Jr.

  • The ever-popular tomato, while not as venerable as the plants of Pompeii, or of the ancient Aztecs, has a very long and fascinating history.

    Starting out as a plant of distinctly ill repute,

    it has enjoyed a varied career replete with superstition and more

    than a few hints of witchcraft.

    And it is, by far, now the most popular garden plant we have.

    Three out of four backyard gardens harvested tomatoes last summer, a record unsurpassed by any other vegetable.

  • The Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area will provide assistance on June 6-7 for family members who wish to visit remote cemeteries and do minor clean-up of graves of their relatives.

    This assistance will be provided to the park cemeteries that are not easy to access and located inside the park boundary.

    Transportation from a designated area in the park to the cemetery will be provided only to those who are physically unable to walk round trip, based on a first-come, first-served basis.

  • Gold City, the Gadsden, Ala.-based award-winning Southern Gospel ensemble, will give a benefit performance beginning at 7 p.m. June 6 in Harriman’s Princess Theatre at 421 Roane St.

    Proceeds from the performance will support the Princess Theatre Foundation.

    The group includes, from left, Robert Fulton, Daniel Riley, Tim Riley, Chip Pullen and Bryan Elliott.

    Tickets are $15 and are available at Rocky Top General Store and Harriman Jewelry Exchange.

  • The McKameys, a premier East Tennessee family gospel-singing group from Clinton, will host their 31st annual Hometown Singing on June 6-7 in Clinton Second Baptist Church.

    The Inspirations of Bryson City, N.C., will be the special guest at 7:30 p.m. Friday.

    Saturday’s special guest will be The Rochesters of Blacksburg, S.C., at 6 p.m.

    Reserved seating is $15; general admission is $13.

    Call 865-457-3678 for details or to purchase tickets by phone.

  • As summer approaches and many Tennesseans go outdoors for hiking and boating and other warm-weather activities, snakes will emerge as well. Vanderbilt University Medical Center medical toxicologist John Benitez, associate professor of clinical medicine and emergency medicine, offers tips for avoiding these reptiles and what to do if bitten.

  • The congregation of Bethel Presbyterian Church, Kingston, recently received notification from the National Wildlife Federation that the church has been officially certified as a Wildlife Habitat site.

    Church members have been has been working since 2009 to make the landscape around the church more environmentally friendly to nature.

    Many areas around the church are mulched to create plant space that improves habitat for wildlife by providing essential elements needed – natural food sources, cover and places to raise their young.