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Today's Features

  • The congregation of Rockwood Wesleyan Church will honor the faithful service of Pastor Robert “Bob” Lower during its 11 a.m. service on June 8.

    Lower, who has served as church pastor for 21 years, is retiring. He has also served as chaplain for the Rockwood Fire Department during his 21 years with the Wesleyan Church.

    The public is welcome to join in the celebration of Lower’s dedication to the Lord, his community and his congregation.

    Rockwood Wesleyan Church is at 300 S. Church Ave.

  • Bro. Joe Moore of Scarboro Church of Christ, Oak Ridge, will be the guest speaker at Sevier Drive Church of Christ, Harriman, on June 1.

    Moore will teach Sunday school 10:45 a.m. and deliver the service message at 11:30 a.m.

    The church is at 1014 Sevier Drive.

  • Batley Baptist
    “Weird Animals: Where Jesus’ Love is One of a Kind” is the theme of Batley Baptist Church’s vacation Bible school. The VBS will be May 27-31; classes will be from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Saturday. The church is near Oliver Springs at 670 Batley Road. Call 435-2400 or email batleychurchoffice@comcast.net for details or transportation.

  • It started with a nagging cough.

    Saundra Gillum thought it was probably just some sort of cold virus and, like most moms, disregarded her health concerns in favor of caring for others. Her adult son was going through cancer treatment, the holidays had arrived, and her time was precious.

    “I didn’t think about myself,” Gillum said. “I was thinking more about my son.”

  • What is in fashion governs us more than we realize.

    There are fashions in everything: clothes, foods, decorative arts, jewelry, hair styles, home decor, music, dance and drama, manners and morals, and, surprisingly, flowers.

    Wearing flowers is at a low point currently, but flowers were worn as lapel corsages or hair ornaments with almost any outfit in the 1930s and ’40s. And this was the heyday of the gardenia.

  • 25 Years Ago
    Kingston property owners who did not live in the city had their hopes — and their votes — dashed with a 1987 Kingston City Charter change. It was the first time in many years non-residents who own property were excluded from determining Kingston mayor and City Council members. Consequently, it kept residents of Harriman, Rockwood, Oliver Springs and Oak Ridge who owned property in Kingston from voting in two of the county’s municipal elections.

  • One of Cumberland County Playhouse’s most popular productions, “Smoke on the Mountain,” returns to the stage of the Crossville theater on May 30.

    Now in its 21st consecutive year at Cumberland County Playhouse, “Smoke” continues to play to sold-out crowds and delight audiences again and again.

    “The publisher, Samuel French Inc. — the oldest and largest publisher for plays and musicals in the world — tells us it’s the most popular show they license,” said director Weslie Webster.

  • The observation deck of the Sunsphere in Knoxville’s World’s Fair Park is now open and offering an updated experience.

    In addition to basic upgrades including new floor and ceiling tiles, the observation deck features updated information on the numerous and diverse educational and entertainment opportunities Knoxville has to offer.

    “The Sunsphere is the first thing many people see when they come to visit our city and a favorite spot for locals in the community,” said Kim Bumpas, president of Visit Knoxville.

  • Kingston American Legion Post 110 will have its annual Memorial Day observance beginning at 10 a.m. May 26 at Bethel Cemetery.

    U.S. Army retiree Rod Schneider will be the keynote speaker for the event.

    The program includes a call to order by Cmdr. Randy Heidle, Cub Scout Pack 101’s presentation of colors, placing of the wreath by Buddy Miles, and invocation by Ab Armour.

    The observance will close with roll call by Cherokee Middle School, a 21-gun salute by the Roane County Honor Guard and the playing of taps by buglar Mike Rotters.

  • Farmers and farmers’ markets across the state have increased their reach to the more than 1.3 million Tennesseans participating in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP, formerly known as Food Stamps.

    The Tennessee Department of Human Services, the Tennessee Department of Agriculture and the USDA’s Food and Nutrition Service recently had a Farmers’ Market On-Site Application and Approval Event for those interested in receiving free wireless point-of-sale devices equipped to accept SNAP benefits.