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Today's Features

  • Roane Countians have an opportunity to be screened to reduce their risks of having a stroke or bone fracture.

    Kingston Church of Christ’s family life center will host a University of Tennessee Medical Center Life Line screening on Aug. 11. The site is at 120 W. Spring St.

    “I want to thank you very much, because this screening saved my life,” said Mary Davis of Oliver Springs about a recent Life Line screening.

    Stroke is the third-leading cause of death and a leading cause of permanent disability.

  • East Tennessee Preservation Alliance is now accepting nominations for the 2014 East Tennessee Preservation Awards.

    The awards recognize outstanding individuals, organizations and projects contributing to historic preservation efforts within the 16-county ETPA region, which includes Roane County.

    The awards will be presented during the awards banquet, in conjunction with the East Tennessee Preservation Conference, on Nov. 6 in Oak Ridge.

  • Babies born at Methodist Medical Center, Oak Ridge, to Roane County parents:
    July 11 — Amy Lankford, Harriman. A boy, Blake, 6 pounds, 4 ounces. Sibling: Brock. Grandparents: Carol Lankford; Larry Mullenix.

    July 17 — Reagan Palmer and Chris Turpin, Oliver Springs. A boy, Connor Preston, 7 pounds, 9 ounces. Grandparents: Neda Foster; William Palmer Jr.; Turpin and Edna Turpin.

  • The Living Light Solar House, an ambassador for good design and energy efficiency while at the University of Tennessee, is now open to the public at the Children’s Museum of Oak Ridge.

    This newest exhibit was built by University of Tennessee students.

    UT donated the solar house to the Children’s Museum, where it arrived May 17.

    The new exhibit invites children and families to experience sustainability in an energy-efficient house recognized for its architectural design.

  • An abandoned well drilled in the early 1900s on the banks of the Obed River has been plugged through a collaborative effort between Emory River Watershed Association, Tennessee Valley Authority, Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency and the National Park Service.

    The well was at Potter’s Ford in the Catoosa Wildlife Management Area.

    Project funding was obtained by the Emory River Watershed Association from the Tennessee Valley Authority’s Environmental Restoration and Enhancement Project Program.

  • Classes to learn flower arranging are popular all over the world, and this great interest in flower artistry has led to the development of a great number of related industries.

    Within the last 30 years or so, the British, by their own account, have had a tremendous revival of interest in this ancient art.

    It has touched thousands of lives, raised the standards of floristry and caused a great revival of interest in the flower paintings, flower containers, books about the history of flowers and their uses, and in the development of new plants.

  • With the theme, “The Warrior Tradition,” warriors past and present will be honored during the seventh annual Spirit of Nations Powwow from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Aug. 9 at Chilhowee Park, Knoxville.

    Veterans and active-duty personnel will be admitted free. In addition to honoring military personnel of today, Robert Eldridge of Cherokee, N.C., will have a special display related to the Thomas Legion, a primarily Cherokee Confederate regiment that spent a considerable amount of time in East Tennessee.

  • A free informational meeting for those interested in becoming volunteers with Human Animal Bond in Tennessee will be from 6 to 8 p.m. Aug. 5 in Episcopal Church of the Resurrection, Loudon.

    Doors open at 5:30 for registration.

    HABIT is an animal-assisted therapy program. It is a non-profit group of volunteers working together to promote the bond between people and animals.

  • Obed Wild and Scenic River will have two programs on Aug. 2.

    Join National Park Service rangers for a free cup of coffee and informational session at Lilly Bridge from 10 to 10:30 a.m.

    The Climb With a Ranger program will be from 11 a.m.

    to 3 p.m., beginning at Lilly Bridge.

    The park will provide all gear for rock climbing. Those participating should bring drinking water and sturdy footwear.

    Depending on participant interests and ability levels, participants will travel to one of several different climbing areas around the park.

  • Piano students of Nancy Skidmore and vocal students of Tommy Taylor recently performed in a recital in Kingston First Baptist Church.

    The students, with their teachers, are, front row from left, Levi Parish, Avery Parish, Savannah Turpin, Jacqueline Turpin; second row, Skidmore, Rebekah Sanders, Skye Clemmons, Toby Taylor, Declan Brewer, Tucker King; third row, Sophie King, Cynthia Roberts, Mary Beth Oliver; and back row, J.B. King, Emma Barnett, Jacob Mincke, Lauren Baggett, Rachael Baggett and Taylor.