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Today's Features

  • Mankind has sought to outwit nature since the beginning of gardening.

    There is something fascinating about having summer flowers in winter and enjoying fruits and vegetables out of their seasons.

    Forcing plants and building greenhouses have become sophisticated arts, despite the advent of modern transportation capable of bringing us fruits, flowers and vegetables from other climes so that the seasons no longer really matter.

  • 25 Years Ago

  • It's summertime, and time for the Rockwood Public Library’s 2014 summer reading program.

    This is the 26th annual statewide summer reading program in Tennessee. The theme is “Fizz, Boom, Read!”

    “We will be exploring all things science this summer,” said Rockwood Library Director Margaret Marrs. “These programs are designed not only to encourage the individual reading habits of older kids, but also to inspire and delight preschoolers.”

  • Shayla Joy Barber and Chancey Randall Miller are happy to announce their engagement and forthcoming marriage.

    The couple will be married June 7, 2014, at First Baptist Church in Rockwood. A reception will follow at Club Grande at Grande Vista Bay.

    The bride-elect is the daughter of Shannon Barber and Larry Frost, both of Rockwood. She is the granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. George Barber of Rockwood.

  • Wesley Colyer and Michelle Hreha Colyer of Kingston announce the forthcoming marriage of their daughter, Heather Anne Colyer, to Zachary Zeigler.

    He is the son of Terry and Marge Thompson and Tom Zeigler of Kingston.

    The ceremony will be on June 14 at Scott-Ellis Pavilion in Kingston.

    The bride-elect is the granddaughter of the late William and Mary Colyer, and Maria Hreha of Kingston and the late Stephen Hreha.

    She is a 2009 graduate of Midway High School and is a current student at Roane State Community College.

  • Mankind has sought to outwit nature since the beginning of gardening.

    There is something fascinating about having summer flowers in winter and enjoying fruits and vegetables out of their seasons.

    Forcing plants and building greenhouses have become sophisticated arts, despite the advent of modern transportation capable of bringing us fruits, flowers and vegetables from other climes so that the seasons no longer really matter.

  •  

  • Pastor Jesse Sr. and Elfredia Williams celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary Tuesday, May 27.

    Pastor Williams was in the Air Force stationed in Alaska. Elfredia was a student at the University of Tennessee.

    When he was on leave, he and Elfredia were married by the late Rev. C.W. Matthew in Mount Calvary Baptist Church.

    Afterward, Pastor Williams was stationed in California. After his discharge from the Air Force, they made their home in Knoxville.

    They are parents of two children, Lourenda Pryor and Jesse Jr.

  • The ever-popular tomato, while not as venerable as the plants of Pompeii, or of the ancient Aztecs, has a very long and fascinating history.

    Starting out as a plant of distinctly ill repute,

    it has enjoyed a varied career replete with superstition and more

    than a few hints of witchcraft.

    And it is, by far, now the most popular garden plant we have.

    Three out of four backyard gardens harvested tomatoes last summer, a record unsurpassed by any other vegetable.

  • The Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area will provide assistance on June 6-7 for family members who wish to visit remote cemeteries and do minor clean-up of graves of their relatives.

    This assistance will be provided to the park cemeteries that are not easy to access and located inside the park boundary.

    Transportation from a designated area in the park to the cemetery will be provided only to those who are physically unable to walk round trip, based on a first-come, first-served basis.