.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Business

  • TNComp handles contested filings

    The Tennessee Bureau of Workers’ Compensation now uses an innovative new system that allows attorneys and self-represented litigants to file documents without printing copies or traveling to Bureau offices across the state.
    The new TNComp electronic filing system allows all parties to file contested case pleadings in a more efficient and cost-effective manner.

  • Meetings to assist nuclear workers

    Nuclear workers at Oak Ridge’s Y-12, X-10/Oak Ridge National Laboratory and K-25 Plants are encouraged to attend one of the upcoming Cold War Patriots meetings for customized information about government compensation and health-care benefits they have earned.

    The first meeting will be on March 19 in Kingston’s Noah’s Event Venue at 1200 Ladd Landing.

    Subsequent meetings will be March 20 at Oak Ridge Double Tree, March 21 at Clinton Community Center, and March 22 at The Venue at Lenoir City.

  • Has credit card DEBT gotten out of HAND?

    U.S. consumers racked up $92.2 billion in credit card debt during 2017, pushing outstanding balances past $1 trillion for the first time ever, according to WalletHub’s latest Credit Card Debt Study, based on Federal Reserve data released last week.

    Only four times in the past 30 years have Americans spent so much in a year, the WalletHub study revealed. And in each of those prior cases, the charge-off rate – currently hovering near historical lows – rose the following year.

  • Sears Chamber’s top business in March
  • Big & Loud

    Nicole Mailloux, 81, Rockwood, extends her foot in front of her body and gracefully bends forward from the waist.

    “You bow like you are meeting the queen,” she said in her gentle French accent.

    Mailloux is explaining an exercise at Harriman’s Patricia Neal Outpatient Center that’s part of physical therapy designed for patients struggling with the effects of Parkinson’s disease.

    The Lee Silverman Voice Training BIG and LOUD therapy is a life-changing course of treatment for people like Mailloux.

  • Life-changing therapy retrains the brain

    Parkinson’s disease is a slow progressing, degenerative disease that robs its victims of their vibrancy, causing strong voices to become weak and physical movement to become restricted.

    LSVT BIG and LOUD helps patients regain mobility, balance, and speech, regaining their identity in the process.

    LSVT BIG and LOUD is not a cure for Parkinson’s disease, but studies indicate the therapy can slow down and even reverse some symptoms.

  • Out to Lunch: Old Capital Public House a great place to meet friends

    My “Out to Lunch” articles maybe should just be about food, but I enjoy also writing about the people I get to visit with.

    Previous readers know that I also invite folks to join my wife Carol and me for our adventures.

    I asked Paul Foust and Lisa Stooksbury to meet us for our latest lunch adventure at the new restaurant, Old Capital Public House. It opened on Dec. 15 next door to Kingston Food City at Ladd Landing, in the former Gloria Jean’s location.

  • Buoyed prospects: Roane Alliance marks a stellar year

    Following a strong performance in 2017, Roane County is poised for future success, according to a report from The Roane Alliance.

    The Alliance’s 2017 Annual Report released last week highlights achievements that include infrastructure improvements, new marketing materials and a new marketing plan.

    “The county benefitted greatly from our work with the Alliance last year,” County Executive Ron Woody said.

  • Harriman Care and Rockwood Signature Great Places to Work

    Independent analysts at Great Place to Work have crunched the numbers and certified Harriman Care and Rehabilitation Center and Signature HealthCare of Rockwood are as Great Places to Work.

    The two facilities in Roane County earned this distinction based on extensive ratings given by its stakeholders in anonymous surveys.

    “It’s a testament to the hard work exhibited by our great team,” said Benjamin Landy, CEO of Harriman Care and Rehabilitation Center.

    Landy said he is extremely humbled to receive this certification.

  • Kingston's top worker

    The city of Kingston named water department employee Shawn Clark, center right, as February’s employee of the month.

    The presentation of the honor at last week’s Kingston City Council meeting includes, from left, Mayor Tim Neal, City Manager David Bolling, Clark’s wife Susie, son Jacob and Clark’s supervisor Jimmy Agee.