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Business

  • Businesses give to Educational Foundation
  • Parsons Plumbing now open

    After almost 40 years in the plumbing business, Chet Parsons has opened his own business.

    Parsons Plumbing opened in Midtown on April 28.

    Parsons, formerly of Ideal Plumbing in Rockwood, has 37 years of experience in the field.

    He offers service plumbing and home plumbing repair.

    Parsons Plumbing is open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Call 466-4914 for details.

  • 68th Chamber Banquet

    The Roane County Chamber’s business awards were presented during the 68th Annual Banquet.  

    One of the largest crowds in recent years attended the event, with their fellow Chamber members being honored for outstanding service.  

  • VECustomers awards groups 2,500 in March

    Volunteer Energy Cooperative’s VECustomers Share program awarded $2,500 in grants to Roane County organizations in March. The program, founded in October of 2001, has donated more than $4.8 million to various community-service organizations.

  • Electrical safety courses offered

    Pellissippi State Community College will offer a “Train the Trainer” NFPA 70E course for supervisors, operators, mechanics, engineers and safety personnel during the month of May.

    The four eight-hour classes are geared toward teaching safe electrical practices and hazard recognition and mitigation in the workplace. Cost is $3,000 per person, and classes are at the Hardin Valley Campus, 10915 Hardin Valley Road. Classes are 8 a.m.-4 p.m., May 8, 15, 22 and 29.

  • Free workshop for small businesses

    The Tennessee Small Business Development Center, in partnership with the University of Tennessee CIS-PTAC, will offer a free workshop for small businesses on “How to do business with the government”.  

    The program is designed to introduce attendees to the diversity of government purchasing. Participants will learn how to navigate the process and bid successfully in the government marketplace.

    To sign up call 865-483-2668, email jbangs@tsbdc.org, or visit www.roanestate.edu/tsbdc.

  • Lowe’s deal to protect from lead pollution

    Lowe’s Home Centers has agreed to implement a comprehensive, corporate-wide compliance program at its more than 1,700 stores nationwide to ensure that contractors it hires to perform work minimize lead dust from home renovation activities, as required by the federal Lead Renovation, Repair and Painting Rule.

    The U.S. Department of Justice and Environmental Protection Agency reported the company will also pay a $500,000 civil penalty, which is the largest ever for violations of the RRP Rule.

  • Employment outlook continues to brighten

    The job front continues to look better in Roane County and the state.
    Both posted a 7 percent unemployment rate in March, a decrease of 0.3 points, according to statistics recently released by the Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development.

    In Roane County, that means 24,070 workers in the county’s 25,900 labor force were employed during the month.

    Things were bleaker last March. In 2013, both the county and state had jobless rates of 8.4 percent.

    The U.S. unemployment rate in March was 6.8 percent, down 0.2 percent.

  • OUT to LUNCH: Chomp on gator, other Cajun goodies at Bayou Bay

    I called to ask our Pease Furniture friends to join us for an “Out to Lunch” adventure at Bayou Bay Seafood House.

    “That’s one of Jerry’s favorite South Knoxville places to eat,” Mickey Pease said. “He really like their gumbo.”

    Bayou Bay is at 7117 Chapman Hwy. in a colorful blue building.

    Gumbo originated in southern Louisiana during the 18th century. It’s made with strongly flavored stock, meat or shellfish, a thickener and seasoning vegetables.

  • ORAU session gauges nuclear energy rebirth

    Declines in new construction, evolving safe-ty regulations, and building the next generation of nuclear engineers and researchers are among the challenges facing the future of nuclear energy.

    But there is hope, according to a top Nuclear Regulatory Commission official.