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Business

  • 100,000 tax-return preparers failed to follow guidelines

    As part of its new oversight program of the nation’s tax-return preparation industry, the Internal Revenue Service is sending letters to an estimated 100,000 who prepared returns in 2011 but failed to follow new requirements.
    All paid tax-return preparers must obtain a Preparer Tax Identification Number and, when required to do so, sign their names and include their PTINs on returns and refund claims they prepare for compensation.

  • Turpin heads up Chamber board

    Danice Turpin, director of Tennessee Technology Center at Harriman, is the new chairwoman of the Roane County Chamber of Commerce board of directors.

    Turpin took over July 1 from outgoing board Chairwoman Diana Knobloch, director of the Roane County United Way.

    The new Chamber chairwoman for 2011-12 holds an undergraduate degree in engineering, a master’s degree in adult education, and an educational doctorate degree in instructional leadership.

  • DOE razing east wing of K-25 building

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s demolition of Building K-25’s east wing began last month.
    The former uranium enrichment facility at East Tennessee Technology Park was once the world’s largest building under one roof, covering more than 44 acres.
    The project is one of DOE’s highest environmental management priorities in Oak Ridge and an integral component to completing cleanup of the technology park.

  • Subway aims for Midtown to 'eat fresh'

     

    Travis Christopher and other members of his crew work on the interior of the new Subway with drive-through in Midtown. Reports are that the new restaurant, which is moving into the former Starbucks location near Pinnacle Pointe shopping center, will be open today, Monday. Subway also has standalone restaurants in Harriman, Kingston, Oliver Springs and Rockwood. There are also franchises in Walmart Supercenter, Rockwood, and Pilot Food Mart on Lawnville Road, Kingston.

  • Rockwood Sonic Drive-in in Top 48 in store contest

    Rockwood’s Sonic Drive-In Restaurant crew advances to the top 48 in a competition with 2,500 other stores.
    Announced earlier this year that they were in the top 300 in the Dr. Pepper Sonic Games Competition, which is based on a variety of factors including mystery shopper reviews and employee scores on online quizzes, the Rockwood crew is excited about the possibility of getting in the final 12.

  • Rayson TBR senior counselor

    Oak Ridge lawyer Robert W. Knolton with Kramer Rayson LLP has been named a senior counselor of the Tennessee Bar Association.
    Knolton was awarded the designation at the TBA’s annual convention held recently in Chattanooga.
    Senior counselors are those Tennessee Bar Association members who, during the coming membership year, will reach 75 years of age or complete 50 years of practice.
    They are honored for their service to the profession.
     

  • VEC grants for Midway youth
  • Out to lunch by Bethel Poston: Jefferson Soda Fountain another well kept Oak Ridge secret

    My wife, Carol, and I grew up in the “Secret City” — Oak Ridge.  Part of our education was, “What you see and hear here, stays here.”
    Evidently our former Oak Ridge High School classmates practiced this by not telling us about the Jefferson Soda Fountain until our recent reunion.   Janet Harlan and Marjorie Matthews both suggested our committee have lunch there.

    Rolland Carvel “Dudley” Hoskins opened the Oak Ridge Hoskins Drug Store in 1944 at this location, 22 North Jefferson Circle.

  • Thyroid uptake probes offered

    Roane Medical Center now provides thyroid uptake testing in addition to thyroid scans, offering a comprehensive testing menu for patients.
    The nuclear medicine department at the Harriman-based hospital acquired a new thyroid
    uptake probe, Biodex Atomlab 950, to assess thyroid function in patients.
    The thyroid uptake probe helps determine the presence of over- or under-active thyroid glands.

  • Cancer Institute study backs screening given to DOE workers

    The National Cancer Institute has released findings agreeing that low-dose CT scans can prevent 20 percent of deaths from lung cancer in high-risk individuals.
    The landmark study, published late last month in the New England Journal of Medicine, backs the CT scanning for early lung detection that has been given to Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Y-12 and K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Plant nuclear workers since 2000.