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Business

  • New VP for RMC parent company Covenant Health

    Larry Kleinman has been named Covenant Health’s executive vice president for human resources.
    Covenant is the parent company of Harriman’s Roane Medical Center.
    Kleinman succeeds the retiring Sam Buscetta.
    He most recently served as senior vice president for global talent management and customer innovation at Kenexa, a Pennsylvania-based company specializing in human resources technology and products.
    Kleinman’s experience in health-care leadership includes serving as chief human resources officer for Providence Health and Services in Seattle.

  • Brewer, Kerley awarded certification

    Two finance officers from Roane County municipalities were among more than 90 to be awarded the Certified Municipal Finance Officers certificate recently in Nashville.
    Kingston’s Carolyn Brewer and Harriman’s Charles Kerley were in the class that included 97 individuals representing 86 cities and one utility district.
    They completed a two-year program that consisted of 11 courses and exams covering eight different topics.
    Brewer and Kerley were awarded their CMFO certification by Justin P. Wilson, Comptroller of the Treasury.

  • Out to Lunch: No better 100th celebration than lunching at Newk’s

    Newk’s, my 100th published “Out to Lunch” adventure, came recommended by folks in the medical field.
    I previously mentioned a surprise interview with Knoxville Orthopedic Clinic nurse practitioner Nancy Dusek, who had injected my hip with “WD-40” (steroid).
    I asked her to recommend another place to have lunch when I went back for a refill four months later. She encouraged me to try Newk’s at the west end of Turkey Creek.
    I drove out Turkey Creek on my way home, eyeballed the café and made a mental note to put it on my prospect list.

  • Training program receives grant

    Roane State Community College’s Advanced Materials Training and Education Center is the recipient of a $5,000 grant from Oak Ridge National Laboratory.
    ORNL recently won a Gordon Battelle Prize for scientific discovery and technology impact.
    As a Gordon Battelle Prize winner, ORNL was given the opportunity to direct a $5,000 education grant to the school (K-12 or higher education) of its choice.

  • Lots of work involved in new catering venture

    Hungarian chef Andras Bartha lays the foundation for his new Kingston business, Caramella Catering.

    The business will be in the former Blue Moon Café near Kingston City Park.

    Bartha plans to set up cooking classes and different events each month.

    He also plans on having a sidewalk bistro during the summer with premade lunches for Watts Bar Lake visitors and a European-style market at Christmas.

    “I think I’m making something really good for the community,” he said.

  • OR plant workers part of cancer scanning

    Nuclear workers from Oak Ridge are among the 10,000 who have received low-dose CT scans to detect early-stage lung cancer.
    The scans are part of the Worker Health Protection Program, a medical surveillance program for U.S. Department of Energy workers.
    A recent national study confirmed that low-dose CT scans can prevent death from lung cancer in high-risk individuals.
    Nuclear workers from Oak Ridge’s K-25 Site, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Y-12 facilities continue to be offered this medical screening technology at no cost.

  • Course to certify sellers of food in domestic kitchen

    Individuals who use a domestic kitchen to prepare, manufacture and sell food to the public can ensure their facilities meet Tennessee Department of Agriculture regulations through an upcoming course presented by University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture Food Science Technology and UT Extension faculty.
    Domestic Kitchen: Tennessee Food Safety Certification will be from 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. March 24 in the Ed Jones Auditorium of Ellington Agricultural Center at 440 Hogan Road, Nashville.

  • Congressman takes tour of Y-12 facilities

    U.S. Rep. Chuck Fleischmann, R-Ooltewah, toured the Y-12 National Security Complex in Oak Ridge earlier this month with Tom D’Agostino, administrator of the National Nuclear Security Administration.

    Taking part in the congressman’s first visit to the facilities are, from left, Darrel Kohlhorst, president and general manager of B&W Y-12 LLC; Fleischmann; D’Agostino; and Ted Sherry, manager of NNSA’s Y-12 Site Office.

    Y-12 is operated for NNSA by B&W Y-12, a partnership of Babcock & Wilcox and Bechtel National.

  • Beta Club gets Volunteer boost

    Midway Middle School Principal Nadine Jackson accepts a $2,000 grant check on behalf of the school’s Beta Club from Alton Lingerfelt, a board member for VECustomers Share.

    Volunteer Energy Cooperative’s VECustomers Share also recently awarded $1,000 to the Midway Music Club.

    VECustomers Share is a non-profit, tax-exempt charitable organization covering Volunteer Energy’s 17-county service area.

  • Hospital sees red for good heart health

    Some Roane Medical Center employees recently traded in their scrubs and sported their best red attire to show support for American Heart Month and National Wear Red Day.

    “The ladies in our department felt we had to recognize heart disease. It isn’t just a ‘man’s disease’ anymore,” said Wanda Diden, mammography technologist at Roane Medical Center of Harriman.

    “Heart disease is the No. 1 cause of death in women over 20 years old,” she added. “We’ve been forced to