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Local News

  • Starved-child dad on third lawyer

    The father accused of starving his 2-year-old son to death is now on his third attorney.

    A. Philip Lomonaco of Knoxville filed a notice with the court last week that he’s now serving as the attorney for Matthew Dotson. Dotson’s previous attorney, Kent Booher, was suspended by the Tennessee Supreme Court in October for pleading guilty to two counts of statutory rape in Loudon County Criminal Court.

    Booher took over as Dotson’s attorney after Joseph Lodato was allowed to withdraw from the case in July 2013.

  • Trial for Rockwood’s Tom Pierce moved again

    Former Rockwood Public Works Director Tom Pierce was accused of using city funds to make personal purchases in 2013.

    He has yet to go to trial.

    A continuance was granted Nov. 17, and the new trial date is set for March 31 in front of Judge Eugene Eblen.

    “They need to go ahead and come out and get it over with,” said Councilwoman Peggy Evans.

    Evans said she was shocked when the accusations about Pierce emerged, and she called him immediately.

  • DOUGH for DOUGH

    Nothing makes the heart warmer than giving to a worthy cause.

    Except maybe if you are rewarded with the soft warmth of fresh bread baked by Dyllis Springs Elementary School third-grader Molly Duggins.

    Molly was inspired to bake bread to raise money after she saw a mailer sent from St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital featuring a girl named Brooklyn.

    She decided to raise money to help St. Jude’s help children with serious ailments.

  • OS tells resident to sue

    James Horton said he was shocked by the response he got at last week’s Oliver Springs Board of Aldermen meeting.

    “A couple of things are clear,” Horton said. “OS doesn’t care what the charter says.”

    The town charter states, “the newly elected officers of the town shall take offices at 7 p.m. on the first Thursday in November, after the election results have been certified.”

  • Tiger Haven critic files lawsuit

    The dispute between Tiger Haven and neighbor Toby Rhynehart shows no signs of subsiding.

    Rhynehart has filed a civil action in Roane County General Sessions Court, alleging Tiger Haven operator Mary Lynn Haven built a chain link fence on his property and cut down some of his trees.

    “I’ve got pictures,” Rhynehart said. “I’ve got everything. I’ve got some things that she doesn’t even know about. You’ll just have to wait until trial.”

  • Harriman changes CDBG grant focus

    Harriman officials are looking at a Community Development Block Grant to help with the city’s aging infrastructure.

    Officials are looking to meet in the coming weeks with the group who prepares and administers the grant applications for Harriman Utility Board.

    City Manager Kevin Helms said officials are “prepared to talk about other funding resources, as well.”

    “We feel pretty certain a storm drain application would get approved,” Mayor Chris Mason said recently.

  • Candlelight tour at Fort Southwest Point Dec. 13

    Kingston’s Fort Southwest Point will host a Christmas candlelight tour and reception next weekend.

    The tour and reception will be from 6 to 9 p.m. Dec. 13.

    The public is welcome to visit and experience the sights, sounds and flavors common to the people of the 18th century.

    Guests will be greeted at the visitors center for the candlelight tour of the fort.

    Beeswax candles will light the walkway, and bagpipe music will set the tone.

    Special attention will be given to recreate an atmosphere of the past during the event.

  • GUEST OPINION: Cosby allegations double-edged nature of freedom

    By GENE POLICINSKI

    First Amendment Center

    Bill Cosby’s career has been deeply rooted in the possibilities and protections provided by freedom of speech.

    The legendary comedian and actor’s career began with landmark comedy routines in which he tackled sensitive racial subjects. He was the first African American male with a starring role on TV, in the 1960s series “I Spy.”

  • OS officials in, but tallies uncertified

    James Horton has a problem with Oliver Springs’ town officials.

    Newly elected Mayor Jerry Vann and Aldermen Robert Miller, Jeffery Bass and Terry Craze took office on Nov. 6 — two days after the Nov. 4 election.

    The town charter, however, states, “the newly elected officers of the town shall take offices at 7 p.m. on the first Thursday in November, after the election results have been certified.”

  • Kingston’s Thanksgiving Holiday Rush