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Local News

  • Kingston officials ask for help

    Water is a precious resource, but some in Kingston can’t pay the bill for it.

    Kingston city officials decided to launch a voluntary program to add $1 a month to water bills, but a year later, they still haven’t raised enough to meet their initial $1,000 goal.

  • A VIEW from LICK SKILLET: John Cooper Winslow — Harriman’s character

    Erudite reader, as we reminded you in our column of 15 May, next Monday, 15 June will mark the Eight Hundredth Anniversary of the signing of the Great Charter, most commonly known by its Latin name of Magna Carta (sometimes given as Charta).

  • Local bear sightings aplenty

    It wasn’t your typical highway collision: A bear ran into a vehicle traveling eastbound on Interstate 40 in Kingston Wednesday afternoon.

    “She slammed on her brakes, and the bear actually ran into the side of her car,” said Kingston Police Chief Jim Washam.

    He said the dazed animal ran off, but the woman stopped at the Kingston Exxon and talked to a Roane County sheriff’s deputy.

  • Still no vote on county tax rate

    Resolutions to set the tax levy and budget for the upcoming fiscal year got deferred without discussion at Monday’s Roane County Commission meeting.

    The county has yet to receive the certified tax rate from the state, and officials said that is needed in order to adopt a budget.

    Roane County Executive Ron Woody said he knew going into Monday’s meeting the commission wouldn’t be able to vote on the budget. He said the resolutions were put on the agenda to send a message.

  • Splash pad time
  • Graduation coaches making a difference

    Do Roane County schools need graduation coaches?

    That was a question raised by community members and some Roane County commissioners last week in both a public hearing and a commission workshop.

    If you want results, the answer is yes, according to Director of Schools Gary Aytes.

    He said statistics show the school system has increased its graduation rates since adding the coaches.

    Last year the graduation rate was 92.5 percent. It has steadily climbed since 2007, when the graduation rate was 77.3 percent.

  • Event combines love of God with love of boating

    It was a peaceful in the cove of the Blue Springs Marina Saturday. A warm breeze came across the waters as Pastor Chuck Griffin of Luminary United Methodist Church gave the first Blessing of the Fleet with Horizon Yacht Club.

    “And may God bring you all safely in when you turn your boats homeward to shore,” Griffin said into a megaphone as he stood at the pulpit of the Donna Lou Too.

    About 30 boats participated — yachts, pontoons, sailboats and even canoes. Horns and other signaling devices were sounded in place of an “amen.”

  • Woman charged in Harriman fight

    A fight outside the Oasis gas station resulted in a criminal charge for one Harriman teen. Alicia Eskridge, 19, is charged with aggravated assault in the May 30 incident.

    According to the warrant, Cassie Church told Harriman Police Officer Cody Guge that she got into a fight with Eskridge and was stabbed.

    Church was bleeding from her hand, arm and back, Guge reported.

  • Former officer’s case goes to grand jury

    Roane County General Sessions Court Judge Jeff Wicks determined there was enough evidence presented at a preliminary hearing on Monday to send the case against Jeremy Alexander Gambrell to the grand jury.

    Gambrell, a former TVA police officer, is accused of shooting his estranged wife, Jenny Gambrell, in March. He was originally charged with two counts of aggravated assault in the incident, but one of them was upgraded to attempted second-degree murder.

  • Leon Houston verdict in jeopardy?

    Could a recent U.S. Supreme Court decision regarding threats via Facebook help Leon Houston?

    That remains to be seen, but the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals wants to know his stance on the matter.