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Local News

  • Farmer, Woody differ on Plateau Park views

    Roane County already has more than $4 million committed to the Plateau Partnership Park. Roane County executive candidate Mike Farmer declined to discuss how much more taxpayer money he’d be willing to invest in the project if elected.

    “I do not believe that it is prudent to speculate on hypothetical situations,” he said.

    Farmer’s opponent in the Aug. 7 election, incumbent Roane County Executive Ron Woody, was clear about his position.

  • Circuit court clerk hopefuls face off

    The three candidates for Roane County circuit court clerk participated in a forum on Thursday at the Michael Dunn Center.

    The event was hosted by the Roane County Republican Women.

    The candidates – Ann Goldston, Marty Miles and Sarah Stewart – got to make opening and closing statements and answer questions submitted by the crowd.

    Goldston works in the office now as a deputy clerk.

  • Background clean, but no permit for old Grill & Pub

    Roane County’s Beer Board focused on the seedy history of the Grill & Pub last week when it voted down the on-site beer permit request of would be operator Roma Christopher.

    It made no difference that Christopher’s background check came back clean, which was part of attorney Wayne Henry’s argument why the board should permit her to open a facility.

    “We also know this location is clearly a legal location as far as distances and all those considerations,” Henry said. “I know this site has a history —”

  • Rockwood dismisses parks head

    Jody Mioduski is out as Rockwood Park and Recreation director — and if some members of Rockwood City Council wanted to know why he was dismissed, they didn’t hear it — or any discussion, for that matter — before the vote was taken.

    “I was never told the grounds for dismissal, and they have voted to dismiss me from the position,” Mioduski said following Thursday’s meeting in which the Council voted for dismissal.

  • MEDAL OF HONOR: Roane native credited with today’s design of decoration

    One of Roane County’s most notable military men may also be one of its least known.

    Kingston native George Lewis Gillespie Jr. received the Medal of Honor for his bravery as a Union soldier during the Civil War.

    What famously connects him to the military’s highest honor, however, has little to do with the battlefield and a lot to do with ingenuity.

    Possibly, some pride was in there, too.

  • Report cards delayed for many

    Roane County students in grades 3-8 will not receive report cards next week.

    In a news release, Roane County Schools said the delay is due to TCAP scores not being released by the Tennessee Department of Education.

    “These scores determine 15 percent of the second semester grade in math, reading, science and social studies,” the release said.

    Other school systems around the state also had TCAP scores delayed.

    The state gave systems the option to apply for a waiver and send report cards home without the scores being calculated.

  • Kingston, county not filing crime statistics

    The Roane County Sheriff’s Office and Kingston Police Department were two of eight agencies given a Tennessee Incident Based Reporting System “noncompliance status” designation in the state’s 2013 Crime in Tennessee report.

    The report is published by the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation.

  • Syndrome limits girl’s food, not spirit

    A sweet treat is no simple thing for Emma Love.

    A rare disorder means she and her family watch calories and limit splurges.

    “If I watch what I eat, then I can have pizza,” said Emma.

    The Kingston Elementary School student suffers from Prader-Willi Syndrome, a genetic disorder that often causes life-threatening obesity in young people. Children born with the disorder, an abnormality in the 15th chromosome, typically have low muscle tone, short stature and a poor metabolism — often combined with chronic feelings of hunger.

  • Kingston wants to add $1 to bill to help other water customers

    City water board members passed a measure that will help Kingston water customers help each other at their May 13 session.

    The Neighbors Helping Neighbors program will allow water board customers to opt in — at their own discretion — to a program in which $1 extra will be charged on their monthly water bills, and kept in a fund that will be used to help customers facing tough financial straits.

    The program was proposed at city council in April, but was temporarily tabled so officials could devise a plan for implementing it.

  • Kingston makes use of leftover water funds

    With a waterline connection to Rockwood in under budget, Kingston City Council members have turned one project into four.

    The Rockwood interconnection project began with a roughly $2 million federal grant-loan combination to enable Kingston to purchase additional water — if needed — from Rockwood.

    The project wrapped with money to spare. Kingston officials want to use the remaining $724,000 for further water line improvements. But any new work must have a connection to the original project.