Local News

  • County won’t be adding 12 school resource officers

    A wish list of 12 additional school resource officers doesn’t look like it will come true this year for Roane County Schools.
    Commissioner Bobby Collier said the additional officers and other security enhancements were discussed by school and county officials at a joint meeting on May 2.
    “We did not vote to do that,” Collier said, about requesting 12 additional resource officers.
     Collier, chairman of the Roane County Commission’s Safety

  • Water treatment helps Oak Ridge mercury problem

    At the announcement of a new facility to deal with mercury at Oak Ridge, U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn. called mercury contamination “one of the biggest problems we have from the ColdWar era” and said it must be a priority as cleanup resources become available.
    Alexander’s remarks came at a press conference announcing plans for a water treatment facility at the head of the East Fork Poplar Creek.

  • Company scrip tells story of county’s industry history

    For some, a love of history turns into a hobby.
    Tom Carson has done just that, collecting scrip and other monetary items, with a particular focus on Hamilton and Roane counties, where he and his wife Judy own property.
    Scrip was company money typically paid to employees instead of real cash.
    “They paid the employees with these. They were supposedly only good at company stores, but they were (sometimes) good elsewhere, too,” Tom Carson said.

  • Last day

    Howie Rose, left, director of Roane County Office of Emergency Services, laughs with First Responder Program Coordinator Chris Weddington at Rose’s going-away party Friday.

    Rose is leaving his job of 17 years to accept a position with TVA.

  • Homeless: ‘It can happen so quickly, so easily’

    Homelessness isn’t just a big-city issue.

    Even in rural locales like Roane County, residents are finding themselves on the streets.

    They come from all walks of life. Some dealing with lost jobs. Others deal with mental illness.

    Steven Jackson said he’s living wherever he can in Kingston after losing the one place he did have to stay.

    He was living there without utilities, a violation of Kingston city ordinances.

  • Mom accused of giving booze to minors

    An Oak Ridge woman faces four counts of contributing to the delinquency of a minor for allegedly providing her son and his friends alcohol.

    Misti Dawn Butler, 38, was arrested by Oak Ridge police on April 30.

    She’s scheduled to appear in Roane County General Sessions Court in June.

    According to the warrant, a therapist told Craig Jordan that his son admitted to drinking while at Butler’s house for spring break.

    The warrant said Jordan became suspicious and checked his son’s phone.

  • Hwy. 27 northbound lane closed for repairs

    The northbound lane of Hwy. 27 north of Harriman toward Wartburg will remain closed until mid-week for a maintenance project.

    “They are performing slope repair and stabilization utilizing soil nails,” said Mark Nagi, spokesman for Tennessee Department of Transportation Region 1.

    Nagi said work is estimated to be completed on May 8.

    The northbound lane will remain closed until then.

  • Patient airlifted from Midtown crash site

    Lifestar medical helicopter made an emergency landing on Roane State Hwy. in Midtown Friday morning in response to three-car chain-reaction wreck at the intersection of Ruritan Road.

    A patient was airlifted to the University of Tennessee Medical Center for treatment of injuries from the crash. Neither the person’s identity nor the extent of injuries were known at press time.

    According to reports, a green SUV and GMC Terrain were stopped at the traffic light when a Toyota Tundra crashed into the back of the green SUV.

  • Meth trade grows: Record number of labs anticipated in 2013

    Putting medicines containing pseudoephedrine behind the counter. Limiting how much you can buy. Electronic tracking. Requiring people to speak to a pharmacist and show ID before purchasing.

    Those are some of the measures the state has put in place to fight meth production.

    They haven’t worked, according to Tommy Farmer, director of the state’s meth task force.

    “Business is booming,” he said. “Literally and figuratively.”

  • VEC hopes camera on Houstons didn’t irk public

    Volunteer Energy Cooperative is in the business of supplying power.

    “We have no need to watch anyone,” Vice President of Operations Clyde Jolley said.

    Law enforcement might, though, and that’s why authorities sought the help of Volunteer Energy in its investigation of Rocky Houston.

    Jason Dobbs, a special agent with the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, testified in federal court that Volunteer Energy installed the pole camera that law enforcement used to watch Houston.