Local News

  • Animals attack pigs near campus

    Several pigs were killed last month in what is believed to be two animal attacks at a small farm next to the walking trail at Roane State Community College’s main campus in Roane County.

    “We had a call from Roane State because some of the workers drove by there and saw some of the dead pigs,” said Josh Strickland, animal control officer at the Roane County Animal Shelter.

    Later, E911 dispatch called animal control because Frank Burgess’ horses were out in a nearby church parking lot.

  • Paid ’09 taxes keep Caldwell properties off the auction block

    Kingston developer Matt Caldwell has been catching up on some of his unpaid Roane County property taxes.

    Clerk and Master Shannon Conley said his 2009 delinquent taxes were recently paid, preventing the properties from going to auction.
    Conley said her office also received payments on some of Caldwell’s 2010 and 2011 delinquent taxes.

    Following the controversial 2010 countywide reappraisal, Caldwell filed numerous appeals with the State Board of Equalization contesting values on his properties. Those appeals are still pending.

  • New law forgives penalties on ash spill land

    Roane County’s legislative delegation got a bill to pass the General Assembly during the recently completed session that will provide relief for delinquent property taxpayers because of the TVA ash spill, a disaster that occurred more than four years ago.

    “This is a local bill for Roane County,” state Rep. Kent Calfee told his colleagues in the House. “We had the Tennessee Valley Authority Kingston Steam (Fossil) Plant ash spill few years ago. This is to forgive the penalty and lower the interest rate on unpaid taxes.”

  • Kingston manager gone fishing with retirement rod


  • Rockwood TVA money put in special fund

    Rockwood is making sure there is no appearance of impropriety when it comes to its use of the leftover TVA money from the Roane County Economic Development Foundation.

    The city received its most recent request of $716,805 on April 11.

    “They have been put in a special account,” Mayor James Watts told council recently.

    City officials previously caught some flack when Rockwood Water, Sewer and Natural Gas did not immediately receive its portion of TVA money designated for water and sewer projects.

  • Roane County greener than ever before

    The carbon footprint for Roane County has gotten a little smaller.

    The Roane County Industrial Board requested and Rockwood Electric Utility complied in replacing all the streetlights at the Roane County Industrial Park with LED fixtures.

    The board manages the industrial parks for the county and covers the monthly cost of the street lighting.

    “We changed out, I think, a total of 26 fixtures,” said REU manager Kendall Bear.

  • Pinkerton has left the building

    For years, Jim Pinkerton has been the steadying presence in Kingston government, the face that hasn’t changed even as so many others have.
    Mayor Troy Beets noted his “professionalism in the face of my sometimes run-and-gun sort of approach… he’s been the yin to my yang.”
    And Councilman Don White pointed out that he may be the city’s longest-serving city manager. White would know, given that he’s probably the city’s longest-serving councilman, having held the position on and off since the early 1970s.

  • State pulls Roane job center

    Roane County residents will have to go outside the county now for help with much of their career services.
    Tennessee Department of Labor & Workforce Development is pulling out of 34 career centers in June “in order to continue job placement activities with fewer federal dollars,” Acting Commissioner Burns Phillips announced this week in a news release.

  • Emergency chief leaves for TVA spot

    Howie Rose is continuing his career in the emergency field, just not with Roane County.
    The director of the county’s Office of Emergency Services has resigned his position and accepted a job with TVA. 
    “My last full time day of employment will be May 3, 2013,”  he said in a letter to County Executive Ron Woody.
    Rose said now is the time for him to move on.  

  • Junior Ranger program seeks kids

    Tennessee State Parks’ Junior Ranger Program offers children ages 6-14 excellent outdoor educational opportunities.
    There are two ways to become an official Tennessee State Parks’ Junior Ranger.
    Interested children may attend a Junior Ranger Camp in June and July at various parks throughout the state; or complete a series of activities found in the Junior Ranger Adventure Guide.