Local News

  • Tiger Haven lawsuit is dismissed

    An agreed order of voluntary dismissal in the lawsuit involving Tiger Haven and nearby residents was filed in Loudon County Circuit Court on March 4.
    No further details were mentioned.
    Tiger Haven, which is located at 237 Harvey Road in East Roane County, houses several types of big cats, including tigers, lions, leopards and cougars.
    Some neighbors filed a $10 million lawsuit against the facility in 2011 in Roane County Circuit Court, claiming the facility caused fear, personal discomfort, inconvenience and a diminution in property values.

  • Check your detectors at time change

    This weekend, daylight savings time goes into effect Sunday morning, moving time up one hour.
    While moving clocks forward it’s also a great time to change the batteries in the smoke alarms in the home, said Harriman Fire Chief Brad Goss.
    Goss said the Harriman Fire Department has free batteries they can install for Harriman residents.
    Call Station 1 at 882-3072.

  • Cumberland waters to rise

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District poured concrete for the last pile of the barrier wall this week, which completes the last and most critical component of the dam safety project required to mitigate seepage through the karst geology deep in the foundation of Wolf Creek Dam’s embankment.
    The dam is the major impoundment on Lake Cumberland in southeastern Kentucy.
    It is the last of 1,197 piles that are approximately 3 feet in diameter and extend up to 275 feet into bedrock below the foundation of the embankment.

  • Looseleaf Laureate: What’s that flying high up in the sky?

    A few years before I firmly planted myself in East Tennessee, I made a three-day trek, most of it along Interstate 40, to live in Arizona.
    It was a grueling trip, not only because of the mileage and move involved, but because of the mix of emotions tied to any cross-country departure.
    Except for the excitement of seeing antelope for the first time and listening to the most boring audio book that must have ever been recorded, I remember few details about that late-winter journey.

  • 25-percent tax hike has greater potential costs

    By Ron Woody
    Roane County Executive
    Roane County government’s primary goal is to provide a safe environment in which individuals and communities can improve their standard of living. This goal is supported by three pillars of service provided by the county government: education, law enforcement and infrastructure.
    Roane County supports the pillars of service through many objectives, such as evaluating current programs, identifying new programs, assessing sustainability of programs and striving for a viable and stable tax rate.

  • White House threats, regrets – a perspective

    First Amendment Center
    Any time a “very senior person” at the White House tells any reporter that the journalist will regret expressing critical comments about the administration, it is worth noting.
    Reports of such a threat made to The Washington Post’s Bob Woodward — whose news reports on Watergate are now the stuff of journalistic legend — instantly galvanized attention from colleagues and national news outlets.

  • Rockwood wants new fire truck

    Rockwood officials will be considering two bids for a fire truck at a special-called meeting at 4 p.m. Thursday, March 7.
    The city received only two bids.
    One was from Cumberland Trucks in Nashville, which offered a Sutphen vehicle at $410,588.95.
    The other was from EVS Mid-South in Memphis, which bid a Pierce model for $438,428.
    “The committee appointed by Mayor (James) Watts will recommend the low bid,” City Recorder Becky Ruppe said.
    The department already has several Sutphen vehicles in its fleet.

  • Sen. Alexander prepared to block funding over dam fishing issue

    U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander of Tennessee has met with Assistant Secretary of the Army for Civil Works Jo-Ellen Darcy, asking her to delay by seven months the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ proposed fishing restrictions in tailwaters below dams on the Cumberland River.
    Alexander said that the cut of $255 million, or roughly 5 percent, that the Corps faces in automatic spending cuts justifies further consideration of the restrictions, and the exploration of alternatives with state agencies.

  • Leon Houston represents himself

    Leon Houston decided to change course in his federal case on Monday.
    He told U.S. Magistrate C. Clifford Shirley Jr. that he was unhappy with his court-appointed lawyer and wanted to represent himself.
    “Is that really what you want to do?” Shirley asked.
    “Yes, sir,” Houston responded. “That’s what I want to do.”
    Shirley told him such a move is unwise.
    “I honorably disagree,” Houston responded.

  • No parole for Manson clan man

    Charles Manson follower and Roane County High School graduate Bruce Davis won’t be getting out of prison.
    California Gov. Jerry Brown reversed a parole board’s decision that would have allowed Davis to go free.
    “We’re very disappointed,” Davis attorney Michael Beckman said. “This whole thing is politicized. It has nothing to do with Bruce Davis’ dangerousness. He’s not dangerous at all.”
    Manson and his followers went on a gory and well-documented killing spree in California in 1969.