.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Local News

  • Information at hand on court clerk’s website

    One of the goals Kim Nelson had when she took over as Roane County Circuit Court Clerk was to upgrade its public service through technology.
    She took a step in that direction recently with the incorporation of a new website.
    “It’s something I’ve been wanting to do for a while,” she said. “Over the last few months I’ve been getting ideas from the staff on what they thought it needed to contain.”
    The website — www.roanecourts.com — allows people to pay traffic tickets and court costs online.

  • Still time for a Princess Theatre tour

    Visitors are invited to tour the renovated Princess Theatre in downtown Harriman during an open house on Friday, April 13, from 3-6 p.m.
    The event is free and open to the public.
    Channel 15 television station, located next door to the Princess, will also be open for tours.
    “Everyone is invited to stop by and see the new Princess and learn more about Channel 15,” Princess Theatre manager Megan Anderson said. “We would love for everyone to visit and see the exciting things happening in downtown Harriman.”

  • Victim dies in Kingston domestic violence case

    Kingston police and the District Attorney General’s Office were scheduled to meet to determine how to proceed in a domestic-violence case that turned deadly.
    “We should have some direction after that,” Police Chief Jim Washam said.
    James R. Cobb, 63, was taken to the University of Tennessee Medical Center in Knoxville on April 4 after being shot at his home at 814 Rosedale Ave.
    He died on Saturday.
    “It was complications due to the gunshot wound,” Washam said. 

  • Another scenic route planned through Roane

    An effort to promote the Upper Cumberland and Cumberland Plateau region includes seeking a federal designation for the old Walton Road as the Walton Road Scenic Byway.

    A meeting was recently held to get public input on how to promote the old wagon road, which started in Roane County around Fort Southwest Point and crossed the Cumberland Plateau to the Caney Fork and Cumberland rivers near Carthage in Smith County.

    The trail traversed areas which now are parts of Hwy. 70 and Interstate 40 going through Kingston, Harriman and Rockwood.

  • Ghosts may aid old building

    Roane Countians who enjoy seeking ghostly encounters won’t have to go far for a chance to explore a haunted venue.

    Tours of the Temperance Building, which has been the location of several paranormal evidence searches, are coming this month.

    “The tours will be from 10 p.m. to 1 a.m. on the third Saturday of every month, starting in April,” said Richard Ruland, the founder of G.H.O.S.T. Paranormal.

  • Fleischmann stumps in Roane

    The Republican Primary is still months away, but incumbent 3rd District Congressman Chuck Fleischmann said his mind is focused on legislative issues in Washington, D.C.

    “If I were to sit here and worry about primaries, I couldn’t focus on my job,” he said during a recent interview. “I think the best way to get re-elected is to go up there, do your job everyday, do the folks a good job and they’ll reward that at the polls.”

  • Thunder Road
  • EGGS-amining their spoils
  • Kingston police investigating homicide

    A domestic violence case has turned into a homicide investigation for the Kingston Police Department. The change occurred because James Cobb died Saturday night, according to Chief Jim Washam.
    Cobb, 63, was taken to the University of Tennessee Medical Center in Knoxville on April 4 after being shot at his home at 814 Rosedale Ave. Washam said Cobb was shot in the chest.
    The suspected shooter – Tammy Ellen Rosado – was arrested on April 6 and charged with aggravated domestic assault. She could be facing a homicide charge with Cobb’s death.

  • With a song in their hearts

     

    “Are you ready for noise?”

    That’s the question Midtown Elementary School music teacher and choir conductor Beth Trescher posed before a recent rehearsal.

    Children — more than 20 of them — poured in the door just before 4 p.m., excitedly chattering and ready to sing.

    “They’re a lively group,” Trescher said. “And it really has become like a little family. They’re very supportive and help each other.”