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Local News

  • Martial arts master True to form

    Isshin-ryu karate is one of the country’s most popular forms of martial arts, and Harriman’s Tommy True has stayed true to its teachings for 50 years.

    True, a grand master,  operates a school in Harriman, in his Trenton Street location for more than 30 years.
    “I have the oldest Isshin-ryu school in the state of Tennessee right now,” True said.
    With snowy white hair and a boyish grin, True doesn’t look like a dominating force in martial arts, but his dedication and skill are respected.

  • Mother-daughter fight charges dropped

    A mother and daughter who got arrested in February over an alleged fight had their cases disposed in Roane County General Sessions Court on Monday. 
    Teresa Gail Andrews and her daughter, Ashley Gail Andrews, were charged with domestic assault.
    They must pay court costs, but each had her charge dismissed.
    The Andrews were arrested on Feb. 24.
    They had reportedly been together at Claudia’s Bar in Midtown  before the alleged altercation took place at an apartment they shared. 

  • CORRECTION

    An article in the Friday, Sept. 6 edition, listed the wrong day in the schedule for the Kids Cafe.
    The cafe actualy  feeds children Mondays at 5 p.m.

  • Looseleaf Laureate: Heroes can be closer than you might think

    The color of the smoke coming from beneath the hood of a stranded motorist’s car caught Tommy Thompson’s attention.
    It wasn’t white, but gray.
    Thompson could see the driver inside, cellphone planted to her ear, as he passed the sedan on Hwy. 70 near Caney Creek.

    Thompson acted quickly, making a sudden U-turn. The West Roane County resident threw his pickup into park and charged up to the smoking car.

  • Boy, 13, to play at Tennessee Valley Fair

    A young up-and-coming musician from Roane County is scheduled to perform at the Tennessee Valley Fair on Saturday.

    Thirteen-year-old guitar-player Joey Pierce and his band, the Joey Pierce Project, will open for the Southern Drawl Band.

    “He’s like a 30-year-old trapped in a 13-year-old musically,” Joey’s mother, Monica, said. “I’m excited for him. I was really surprised they gave him the opportunity.”

  • Meat manager certified
  • Vandy offers hope against bird flu virus

    Vanderbilt University Medical Center researchers are reporting in the Journal of Clinical Investigation that they were able to kill the deadly laboratory-created H5N1 avian influenza virus with human antibodies to the natural strain of H5N1.
     H5N1 avian influenza virus hasn’t transmitted from person to person in nature, only directly from birds to people. 

  • Former TVA official pleads guilty

    From STAFF REPORTS
    A former TVA vice president who made illegal investments in Iran pleaded guilty last week.
    Masoud Bajestani, 58, was charged in U.S. District Court with conspiracy, violations of the International Emergency Economic Powers Act and the Iranian Transactions Regulations, making a false statement to a federal agency, international money laundering and filing false income tax returns.

  • HUB work may delay traffic

    From STAFF REPORTS
    Water and gas lines being moved and renovated on Pansy Hill may soon result in some traffic issues.
    Drivers may want to stick to Roane Street instead of taking the popular shortcut into the old part of town.
    Harriman Utility Board manager Bill Young said the utility recently had its pre-construction meeting.
    At times, he said, “we are going to have to shut down at least one lane on the bridge.”

  • County employee bonuses approved

    Elected officials will be allowed to grant employee bonuses.
    The Roane County Commission passed the resolution allowing them to do so on Monday.
    The vote was 15-0, but the resolution did spark some discussion.
    The County Executive’s Office calculated $375 for each permanent part-time worker – someone who works a minimum of 1,000 hours a year – and $750 for each full-time employee.
    However, the bonuses are discretionary, meaning an elected official can choose to give some employees more and others less.