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Local News

  • WAYNE BEST: Recreation, youth focus for council candidate

    Wayne Best thinks focusing on the city’s youth and young families is key to seeing Harriman thrive.

    “I think Harriman has great potential,” the Harriman City Council candidate said. “We need to work together. We need to agree to disagree, but we have to work past that to make sure our city and community grows.”

    He’s got adult children and recently started the child rearing again, this time with a young son he helps coach in sporting activities including city league baseball and basketball.

  • Mike Demyanovich: Utilize the city’s assets

    Mike Demyanovich moved to Harriman from Florida, charmed by its Victorian history and beautiful old homes.

    He quickly delved into the community, regularly attending Harriman City Council meetings and active with boards, including the Harriman Utility Board and Harriman Housing Authority.

    “I live here now, so I want to see the city grow,” Demyanovich said. “I want to see the city improve. I want to see everyone have some good opportunities.” He believes a lot can be accomplished with members of the community working together.

  • Buddy Holley: Proud of papermill cleanup, charter changes

    Harriman City Councilman Buddy Holley wants to see some of his projects through.

    From clean-up of the papermill site along the Emory River to the hiring of a city manager, he’s been heavily involved in a lot of change in the city.

    “We have all these things started or in progress, and I would like to see at least part of them completed, part of them completed and moving forward,” explained Holley.

  • J.D. Sampson: Community center essential

    Harriman City Councilman J.D. Sampson has a passion for the city, often willing to go to battle for what he feels is in its best interest.

    “I’ve really enjoyed the last 10 years I’ve been on Council,” he said. “I just love my city and love trying to help to do what we can do.

    “Some people say the city council isn’t doing enough, but in 15  years, we haven’t raised the property tax,” Sampson added.

  • Professionalism takes another turn in clerk race

    Professionalism has again become an issue in the race for Roane County circuit court clerk.

    “Customer service has got to be addressed,” candidate Marty Miles said during a forum last week.

    He wasn’t the only candidate who took aim at the issue.

    “I will also position this office to operate by utilizing the utmost in professionalism,” Sarah Stewart said. “From personal appearance to proper phone etiquette.”

    Miles, Stewart and Ann Goldston are running for circuit court clerk.

  • Circuit clerk candidates slug it out

    Circuit court clerk candidate Sarah Stewart didn’t get a chance to respond at a forum in which opponent Marty Miles took a shot at her.

    “Ms. Stewart, I’d be crazy not to say it, she’s probably walked in that office about two or three times in her life,” Miles said during his closing comments at Tuesday’s candidate forum in Oak Ridge.

    Stewart gave her closing before Miles and didn’t have a chance to answer the allegation.

    She did address it afterward, saying she was at the office several times a week.

  • Rocky Houston in Atlanta pen, could be moved

    Rocky Houston is now in the custody of the Federal Bureau of Prisons as a resident of U.S. Penitentiary Atlanta.

    U.S. District Judge Danny Reeves sentenced Houston to nine years last month for his conviction on a firearms charge.

    USP Atlanta is a medium-security federal penitentiary with an adjacent minimum-security satellite camp and detention center.

    More than 2,500 inmates were housed there – 2,032 at the penitentiary and detention center and 531 at the camp.

  • No frills? Not at this soccer camp
  • Looseleaf Laureate: Kingston woman quietly shares garden’s bounty

    If you travel on Third Street near the Roane County Courthouse in Kingston, chances are you know Pat Ward.

    You just may not know you know her.

    Ward lives in a modest house that might escape your notice; it’s her garden that draws your attention.

    Sunflowers and and corn rise tall.

    Billowing black-eyed Susans nod at squash and beans. Elegant resurrection lilies stand in a group on the side of the house, while, in front, zinnias in primary colors sway gregariously at passing cars.

  • Boys and Girls Club ends first season successfully

    Barefoot children busily color with sidewalk chalk outside while a pair of young girls sing at a piano in the gymnasium.

    Exuberant children fill the Boys & Girls Club in Harriman, which is nearing the end of its summer program. It opened to all school-age children in the Harriman area this summer.

    “It has been going great,” said Reggie Coleman, site director. “The kids are doing well.”

    The program’s goal is to provide children a safe refuge for the summer at a price parents can afford

    Eric Parrott made plenty of friends through the program.