.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Local News

  • Alliance celebrates silver status
  • School board to consider consolidations

    The financial crisis facing the school system has officials looking to explore consolidating high schools.

    “We just need to find out if consolidation does save money or if doesn’t save money,” Roane County Board of Education Member Mike “Brillo” Miller said. “We need all the answers.”

    Miller brought up the idea of consolidation at a meeting in July when board members were grappling with what to do about a $1.582 million shortfall for the 2013-14 fiscal year.

  • Roane Central sample had bacteria

    Tests conducted by the Roane Central Utility District in June showed coliform bacteria in the drinking water.

    “Coliforms are bacteria which are naturally present in the environment and are used as an indicator that other, potentially harmful, bacteria may be present,” the utility said in a newspaper ad. “Coliforms were found in more samples than allowed and this was a warning of potential problems.”

    The utility said boiling water is not necessary, but did advise customers to consult a doctor if they had health concerns.

  • O’Neal’s attorney confident about trial

    If the case against Ralph O’Neal ever does go to trial, his attorney is predicting the state will have a hard time convincing a jury he’s guilty of murder.

    “I honestly don’t think they have the proof to even come close to showing that he’s guilty,” attorney Bob Vogel said.

  • EPA says respirators not needed at ash spill site

    Craig Zeller, project manager for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, said there is a system in place for monitoring the health of people working at the TVA ash spill site.  

    “We have perimeter air monitoring at six stations on site surrounding the work area, and that’s to guard against any off site dust migration from the worker area to local communities,” he said during an interview in June.

    The perimeter monitoring system isn’t the only thing being used, according to Zeller.

  • It seemed like a good idea at the time

    Roane County High School junior Cody Tallent got his Toyota 4-wheel drive pick up truck stuck vertical on the side of the dike Tuesday in Kingston.

    Gary’s Towing came and helped retrieve the vehicle.

  • Motorcycle accident leads to arrest

    A Rockwood man who wrecked his motorcycle last week is facing charges.

    According to the Tennessee Highway Patrol, Robert Fugate was traveling south on Abels Valley Road on Aug. 20 around 3:30 p.m.

    The report said Fugate was on a 2005 Honda CTX when he observed another vehicle making a left turn.

    “The vehicle that was turning is not a vehicle which is related in the crash,” the report said. “The driver of vehicle 1 (Fugate) slammed on the brakes and laid the motorcycle down and slid into a ditch.”

  • Schools hope state shares budget surplus

    The state finished the 2012-13 fiscal year with a $42 million surplus in its general fund. With such good fortune abounding, Roane County Schools is hoping more revenue will find its way to education.

    “Between now and next budget time, we will be asking them if they can help us,” Director of Schools Gary Aytes said about the state.

    The school system is facing a financial crisis that school officials said was caused by cuts in state funding.  

  • Upgrading technology: Kingston, Rockwood get computers

    The Governor’s Children’s Cabinet co-chaired by Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam and First Lady Crissy Haslam has awarded 137 children’s computers to public libraries and family childcare programs across Tennessee.

    Rockwood and Kingston Public libraries received stations that feature  more than 60 educational software titles spanning seven curricular areas all focused on supporting early learning in children. These educational programs use engaging graphics to draw young children to learning.

  • Area ‘Rosie the Riveter’ now celebrating 100 years

    During World War II, Rebekah Givens became a “Rosie the Riveter” when she and her late husband, Beecher, moved to Detroit for work.
    Rosie the Riveter was the name given women who took over the war-effort factory jobs left empty by men who had gone to fight.

    “I have been right up there with the big old gun with the rivets,” said Givens. She made wings for the Curtiss SB2C-5 Helldiver,  a scout-bomber that began rolling off the assembly lines in 1942.
    Givens, who turned 100 last month, grew up fast.