Local News

  • New enforcer may clean up Harriman

    A new and even tougher method of enforcing building codes and an alternative to the municipal courtroom is being considered to deal with Harriman’s most problematic offenders.
    Building Inspector Maria Nelson brought forward the idea of trying an administrative hearing officer to give the city more options to deal with offenders that continue to violate the city’s building and property maintenance codes.
    “The administrative hearing officer option gives us the option of citing higher fines ...” Nelson said.

  • Survivors get special night out

    Relay for Life is all about celebrating and helping to make more cancer survivors.
    Honoring survivors is an important aspect of Relay for Life, and Roane County’s Relay for Life is doing that with a survivor’s night out Friday, April 12. A reception is from 5 to 6 p.m. at what was the Roane Medical Center annex in downtown Harriman, the corner of light 7 and down from the Princess Theatre.

  • A VIEW from LICK SKILLET: First Amendment doesn’t protect barbarism

    A couple of weeks ago, we asked the question — Isn’t it time we defended our Western heritage? We return to this topic today. As this column is dated 29 March, 2012, which is Good Friday this year, it would seem timely to turn once again to the topic of Religion and the First Amendment to the Constitution, which in this regard says: “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion or prohibiting the free exercise thereof ....”


    Instead of expanding Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act, Gov. Bill Haslam wants to use the federal money to purchase private health insurance for Tennesseans.
    He explained how his plan would work during an address before the General Assembly on Wednesday.
    “For the last several months I’ve been working toward a Tennessee plan for health reform — to change the way health care coverage looks in Tennessee,” Haslam said.

  • ‘No taxes’ offered to Midtown merchants

    City property taxes may not be quite the worry many Midtown residents thought it would be when battling Harriman leaders against annexation.
    “I can offer you no taxes,” Harriman City Councilman Buddy Holley recently told two Midtown business owners.
    Holley said he’s learned from Municipal Technical Advisory Service the city can offer a contract to residents of future annexed properties to either hold off on paying city taxes for a certain length of time or until the property is sold to another landowner.

  • Easter Blessings
  • Accused killer released

    Accused killer Shawn Smoot was released from the Roane County Jail Tuesday morning on a $250,000 bond.
    “The parents inquired last week about wiring money to post a cash bond,” Circuit Court Clerk Kim Nelson said. “The money was received by wire transfer last Friday.”
    Paperwork wasn’t signed until Tuesday. Roane County Sheriff’s Assistant Beth Sams said Smoot left the jail at 10:03 a.m.

  • Gun team coach arrested

    Kirt Phillippi of Rockwood was a coach of the WSI-Oak Ridge team that won a national shooting competition in 2010.
    Last week, it wasn’t his marksmanship that interested Harriman police.
    Phillippi was charged with public intoxication on March 19 after police were called about a parking lot urination incident.
    According to police records, Officer Michael Cox was dispatched to Kroger on a report of an intoxicated man in the parking lot.

  • Levee work postponed for two weeks

    Scheduled highway lane closures for geotechnical work at the Kingston levee has been delayed by two weeks because of wintery weather conditions, TVA said.
    TVA has contracted to perform core drilling to assess the health of all 49 TVA dams as part of a continuous improvement campaign.
    Some of this work will be performed from Hwy. 70, affecting traffic flow.
    The drilling was supposed to have begun last Sunday, but will now instead begin on Sunday, April 7.
    One lane of Hwy. 70 in Kingston at the levee will be closed from 7 a.m.-5 p.m.

  • Kingston employee gives railing decorative touch

    Some old wooden railings at the lakefront in Kingston presented a dangerous problem for the city.
    The fix not only shored up the structure, but provided a spirit-lifting work of art, as well as a nod to the many fishermen the water draws.
    Rick Ross, who heads Kingston’s parks and recreation department explained how the decorative new metal railing came about.
    “The other one was just rotting out, and we needed to replace it for safety reasons,” Ross said.