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Local News

  • Ferguson, Beason, Mullins seek road supervisor seat

    Three people have picked up petitions to run for road superintendent in next year’s county election. The list doesn’t include incumbent Tom Hamby.

    “I’m not going to run this time,” Hamby said. “I’ve had some heart problems and I decided this would be a good time for me to get out of it.”

  • CASA to benefit from courts

    Guilty people will have to fork over more money in court fees. At its Nov. 14 meeting, the Roane County
    Commission passed a resolution authorizing the collection of a victims assistance assessment of $45. The resolution said the fee will apply to anyone who pleads guilty, is found guilty or enters a no contest plea.

    The fee will not apply to crimes where the maximum punishment is a fine of less than $500 and no imprisonment. It also won’t apply to traffic offenses, except for DUI.

  • Rockwood recall petition signing day

     

    Rockwood’s recall petition to oust Mayor James Watts and Councilwoman Jane Long from their positions was getting little interest as of nearly 4:30 Tuesday afternoon. The petition was stationed at the Rockwood Event Center on West Rockwood Street from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Tuesday.

  • Kingston First Baptist Youth decorate interstate tree

     

    Lucas Stephenson hands an ornament to Cameron Van Horn, both of Kingston’s First Baptist Church youth group, while decorating a cedar tree on Interstate 40 last week. Every year, the youth group goes out to trim the same tree. It sits between Exits 355 and 352. The tradition of the decorated tree goes back to 1978, and the youth group has been decorating it since 1993.

  • Holiday cheer

    This week gasoline prices dropped below $3 a gallon at some Roane County fuel pumps. They are still well above the $2.65 average for this time last year, according to officials at AAA of East Tennessee.

  • Kingston feels no pain over clinic law

    By MIKE GIBSON
    newsroom@roanecounty.com
    To protect itself from the possible encroachment of unscrupulous pain management clinics, the city of Kingston recently passed a 120-day moratorium on the licensing of such clinics, until new state regulations take effect.
    But given that the proprietors of such clinics don’t even need a business license to operate, will the moratorium provide adequate protections?

  • Flooding forces road closings

    It wasn’t just a dreary end to a holiday weekend.
    The steady rains that began Sunday and continued into Tuesday pushed rivers and creeks from their banks, forced road closures, prompted calls for voluntary evacuations and delayed one Christmas parade for a few days.
    “We have two playgrounds under water right now,” said Kingston parks and recreation director Rick Ross. “Every one of our docks are under water.”

  • Two proposals could impact quality of public education

    State Rep. Julia Hurley said she’s against elected school superintendents.
    However, she has not made up her mind when it comes to school vouchers.
    Both issues could be debated by lawmakers when the General Assembly reconvenes in January.
    “I don’t know how I feel about the school vouchers yet,” Hurley said. “I need to do more research on the bills and ideas coming out before I make a definitive decision on that.”
    Hurley’s district currently includes Roane County and Lenoir City.

  • TVA refires Kingston Fossil Plant

    STAFF REPORTS
    The Kingston Fossil Plant started firing up again this week.
    TVA spokeswoman Barbara Martocci said all nine units at the plant had been offline since September for yearly maintenance, to finalize repairs to the scrubber system and to connect the dry fly ash system.
    Units 1 to 3 came online Monday. Unit 4 was in startup Tuesday, and the remaining five are expected to come back into operation by the end of the year.

  • Miller manager of Rockwood

    Jack Miller didn’t have to wait long to hear confirmation of his new role as Rockwood city administrator.
    In fact, the Rockwood City Council said very little other than a few words of welcome and of high expectations before unanimously voting to move forward with accepting him for the position.
    Vice Mayor Peggy Evans said she thought Miller would do a fine job for the city.
    “I think he’s going to be great,” she said. “We’re going to put a lot of stuff on him.”