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Local News

  • Tiger Haven critic files lawsuit

    The dispute between Tiger Haven and neighbor Toby Rhynehart shows no signs of subsiding.

    Rhynehart has filed a civil action in Roane County General Sessions Court, alleging Tiger Haven operator Mary Lynn Haven built a chain link fence on his property and cut down some of his trees.

    “I’ve got pictures,” Rhynehart said. “I’ve got everything. I’ve got some things that she doesn’t even know about. You’ll just have to wait until trial.”

  • Harriman changes CDBG grant focus

    Harriman officials are looking at a Community Development Block Grant to help with the city’s aging infrastructure.

    Officials are looking to meet in the coming weeks with the group who prepares and administers the grant applications for Harriman Utility Board.

    City Manager Kevin Helms said officials are “prepared to talk about other funding resources, as well.”

    “We feel pretty certain a storm drain application would get approved,” Mayor Chris Mason said recently.

  • Candlelight tour at Fort Southwest Point Dec. 13

    Kingston’s Fort Southwest Point will host a Christmas candlelight tour and reception next weekend.

    The tour and reception will be from 6 to 9 p.m. Dec. 13.

    The public is welcome to visit and experience the sights, sounds and flavors common to the people of the 18th century.

    Guests will be greeted at the visitors center for the candlelight tour of the fort.

    Beeswax candles will light the walkway, and bagpipe music will set the tone.

    Special attention will be given to recreate an atmosphere of the past during the event.

  • GUEST OPINION: Cosby allegations double-edged nature of freedom

    By GENE POLICINSKI

    First Amendment Center

    Bill Cosby’s career has been deeply rooted in the possibilities and protections provided by freedom of speech.

    The legendary comedian and actor’s career began with landmark comedy routines in which he tackled sensitive racial subjects. He was the first African American male with a starring role on TV, in the 1960s series “I Spy.”

  • OS officials in, but tallies uncertified

    James Horton has a problem with Oliver Springs’ town officials.

    Newly elected Mayor Jerry Vann and Aldermen Robert Miller, Jeffery Bass and Terry Craze took office on Nov. 6 — two days after the Nov. 4 election.

    The town charter, however, states, “the newly elected officers of the town shall take offices at 7 p.m. on the first Thursday in November, after the election results have been certified.”

  • Kingston’s Thanksgiving Holiday Rush
  • Holiday flick ‘Wonderful’ milestone for the Princess

    The glimmer of the Princess Theatre’s lights will glow in holiday spirit when the Princess Theatre Foundation presents a showing of the classic holiday film “It’s a Wonderful Life.”

    The Dec. 12 showing will be the first time in many years that the Princess, originally a movie theater, has shown a film. It was all made possible with a newly installed screen, thanks to fundraising efforts of the Princess Theatre Foundation.

    “I think it is fantastic,” Harriman City Councilman Chris Ahler said.

  • Brady, Lewis up for school architect

    The Roane County Board of Education didn’t select an architect at last Tuesday’s special-called meeting.

    But the board narrowed the field to Michael Brady Inc. and The Lewis Group.

    “We’ll do a more thorough interview with them pretty quickly,” Board Chairman Mike “Brillo” Miller said.

    Board members will interview representatives from both firms during a special-called session beginning at 6 p.m. Dec. 4.

  • Harriman goals to be determined in ’15

    Harriman City Council decided to wait until a city manager was hired before determining the city’s future goals and direction.

    Kevin Helms took the reins this month, and it looks like officials have decided to start the new calendar year by having the meeting in January.

    “I think we ought to agree about a long range vision for the city,” said Councilman Buddy Holley.

    Holley said deciding on the city’s identity is important to its future.

  • Capitol Christmas tree from OS for second year in a row

    It’s a tree-peat — make that repeat — for the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture.

    For the second consecutive year, a tree from the grounds of UTIA’s Forest Resources AgResearch and Education Center has been chosen to be the Christmas tree for the Tennessee State Capitol.

    The approximately 75-foot-tall Norway spruce, which was planted on the grounds of the Center’s Cumberland Forest, was felled on Nov. 20.